Journal of Nursing Education

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Major Articles 

Gentle Interruptions: Transformative Approaches to Clinical Teaching

Margaret McAllister, EdD, RN; Marion Tower, MN, RN; Rachel Walker, BN, RN

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2007;46(7)
  • Posted July 1, 2007

Abstract

ABSTRACT

This conceptual article, drawn from the authors’ shared teaching experiences and recent student and clinician evaluation data, set out to reveal and then address some common problems faced by clinical educators and nursing students in the time-constrained, complex, specialized field of clinical learning. We explain and argue the benefits of transformative learning and outline specific strategies for building skills in transformative education, such as interrogating clinical routines and habits, teaching diplomacy skills, and using a process of interruption. Clinical educators can use these strategies to move beyond unwittingly serving the status quo toward consciously contributing to change.

AUTHORS

Received: July 28, 2005

Accepted: November 11, 2005

Dr. McAllister is Associate Professor, University of the Sunshine Coast, School of Health and Sport Sciences, Faculty of Science, Health, and Education, Maroochydore, Queensland, Australia. Ms. Tower is Lecturer, and Ms. Walker is Clinical Coordinator, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Address correspondence to Margaret McAllister, EdD, RN, Associate Professor, University of the Sunshine Coast, School of Health and Sport Sciences, Faculty of Science, Health, and Education, Maroochydore, Queensland, Australia, 4558; e-mail: mmcallis@usc.edu.au.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

This conceptual article, drawn from the authors’ shared teaching experiences and recent student and clinician evaluation data, set out to reveal and then address some common problems faced by clinical educators and nursing students in the time-constrained, complex, specialized field of clinical learning. We explain and argue the benefits of transformative learning and outline specific strategies for building skills in transformative education, such as interrogating clinical routines and habits, teaching diplomacy skills, and using a process of interruption. Clinical educators can use these strategies to move beyond unwittingly serving the status quo toward consciously contributing to change.

AUTHORS

Received: July 28, 2005

Accepted: November 11, 2005

Dr. McAllister is Associate Professor, University of the Sunshine Coast, School of Health and Sport Sciences, Faculty of Science, Health, and Education, Maroochydore, Queensland, Australia. Ms. Tower is Lecturer, and Ms. Walker is Clinical Coordinator, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Address correspondence to Margaret McAllister, EdD, RN, Associate Professor, University of the Sunshine Coast, School of Health and Sport Sciences, Faculty of Science, Health, and Education, Maroochydore, Queensland, Australia, 4558; e-mail: mmcallis@usc.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

This conceptual article, drawn from the authors’ shared teaching experiences and recent student and clinician evaluation data, set out to reveal and then address some common problems faced by clinical educators and nursing students in the time-constrained, complex, specialized field of clinical learning. We explain and argue the benefits of transformative learning and outline specific strategies for building skills in transformative education, such as interrogating clinical routines and habits, teaching diplomacy skills, and using a process of interruption. Clinical educators can use these strategies to move beyond unwittingly serving the status quo toward consciously contributing to change.

AUTHORS

Received: July 28, 2005

Accepted: November 11, 2005

Dr. McAllister is Associate Professor, University of the Sunshine Coast, School of Health and Sport Sciences, Faculty of Science, Health, and Education, Maroochydore, Queensland, Australia. Ms. Tower is Lecturer, and Ms. Walker is Clinical Coordinator, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Address correspondence to Margaret McAllister, EdD, RN, Associate Professor, University of the Sunshine Coast, School of Health and Sport Sciences, Faculty of Science, Health, and Education, Maroochydore, Queensland, Australia, 4558; e-mail: mmcallis@usc.edu.au.

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