Journal of Nursing Education

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Guest Editorial 

The Role of Nurse Educators in Grooming Future Nurse Leaders

Rose O. Sherman, EdD, RN, CNAA; Mary Bishop, MSN, RN, CNAA, CHE

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2007;46(7)
  • Posted July 1, 2007

Abstract

EXCERPT

Ask any group of undergraduate nursing students about their interest in nursing leadership as a career track, and you may be surprised how few students raise their hands. Although there is a high level of awareness in the profession about nursing workforce shortages, the aging of nurses in formal leadership positions in health care agencies and their impending retirement plans are less frequently discussed. Hader, Saver, and Steltzer (2006) found that 55% of nursing leaders plan to retire between 2011 and 2020. These retirements will come at a time when effective nursing leadership will be in critical demand. Yet, many of today’s nursing leaders worry about what will happen when they retire because so few younger nurses seem interested in leadership positions (Sherman, Bishop, Eggenberger, & Karden, 2007). The success of nursing as a profession in facing the challenges ahead will hinge on our ability to proactively recruit, develop, and mentor future nurse leaders. Nurse educators play a key role in providing professional guidance for students and can be instrumental in promoting nursing leadership as a career track.

AUTHORS

Rose O. Sherman, EdD, RN, CNAA is Director, Nursing Leadership Institute, Robert Wood Johnson Nurse Executive Fellow, Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida. Mary Bishop, MSN, RN, CNAA, CHE is Chief Nursing Officer, Jupiter Medical Center, Jupiter, Florida.

Abstract

EXCERPT

Ask any group of undergraduate nursing students about their interest in nursing leadership as a career track, and you may be surprised how few students raise their hands. Although there is a high level of awareness in the profession about nursing workforce shortages, the aging of nurses in formal leadership positions in health care agencies and their impending retirement plans are less frequently discussed. Hader, Saver, and Steltzer (2006) found that 55% of nursing leaders plan to retire between 2011 and 2020. These retirements will come at a time when effective nursing leadership will be in critical demand. Yet, many of today’s nursing leaders worry about what will happen when they retire because so few younger nurses seem interested in leadership positions (Sherman, Bishop, Eggenberger, & Karden, 2007). The success of nursing as a profession in facing the challenges ahead will hinge on our ability to proactively recruit, develop, and mentor future nurse leaders. Nurse educators play a key role in providing professional guidance for students and can be instrumental in promoting nursing leadership as a career track.

AUTHORS

Rose O. Sherman, EdD, RN, CNAA is Director, Nursing Leadership Institute, Robert Wood Johnson Nurse Executive Fellow, Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida. Mary Bishop, MSN, RN, CNAA, CHE is Chief Nursing Officer, Jupiter Medical Center, Jupiter, Florida.

EXCERPT

Ask any group of undergraduate nursing students about their interest in nursing leadership as a career track, and you may be surprised how few students raise their hands. Although there is a high level of awareness in the profession about nursing workforce shortages, the aging of nurses in formal leadership positions in health care agencies and their impending retirement plans are less frequently discussed. Hader, Saver, and Steltzer (2006) found that 55% of nursing leaders plan to retire between 2011 and 2020. These retirements will come at a time when effective nursing leadership will be in critical demand. Yet, many of today’s nursing leaders worry about what will happen when they retire because so few younger nurses seem interested in leadership positions (Sherman, Bishop, Eggenberger, & Karden, 2007). The success of nursing as a profession in facing the challenges ahead will hinge on our ability to proactively recruit, develop, and mentor future nurse leaders. Nurse educators play a key role in providing professional guidance for students and can be instrumental in promoting nursing leadership as a career track.

AUTHORS

Rose O. Sherman, EdD, RN, CNAA is Director, Nursing Leadership Institute, Robert Wood Johnson Nurse Executive Fellow, Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Florida. Mary Bishop, MSN, RN, CNAA, CHE is Chief Nursing Officer, Jupiter Medical Center, Jupiter, Florida.

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