Journal of Nursing Education

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Guest Editorial 

Concept Mapping: An Easy Teaching Strategy that Contributes to Understanding and May Improve Critical Thinking

Marsha Fonteyn, PhD, RN, OCN

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2007;46(5)
  • Posted May 1, 2007

Abstract

EXCERPT

As the articles in this issue of the Journal of Nursing Education demonstrate, nursing faculty continue to strive to develop and evaluate innovative teaching strategies for improving students’ understanding and comprehension of course concepts and materials. A unique pedagogy described by authors in this issue is the use of concept mapping. This technique, sometimes referred to as mind mapping or care mapping, has been defined in the literature as a visual representation of one’s thoughts and ideas (Abel & Freeze, 2006; Hill, 2006), a diagram showing relationships among variables (Ferrario, 2004), and a graphic representation of interrelated information (Cahill & Fonteyn, 2000).

AUTHOR

Marsha Fonteyn, PhD, RN, OCN is Nurse Scientist, The Phyllis F. Cantor Center for Research in Nursing and Patient Care Services, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract

EXCERPT

As the articles in this issue of the Journal of Nursing Education demonstrate, nursing faculty continue to strive to develop and evaluate innovative teaching strategies for improving students’ understanding and comprehension of course concepts and materials. A unique pedagogy described by authors in this issue is the use of concept mapping. This technique, sometimes referred to as mind mapping or care mapping, has been defined in the literature as a visual representation of one’s thoughts and ideas (Abel & Freeze, 2006; Hill, 2006), a diagram showing relationships among variables (Ferrario, 2004), and a graphic representation of interrelated information (Cahill & Fonteyn, 2000).

AUTHOR

Marsha Fonteyn, PhD, RN, OCN is Nurse Scientist, The Phyllis F. Cantor Center for Research in Nursing and Patient Care Services, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.

EXCERPT

As the articles in this issue of the Journal of Nursing Education demonstrate, nursing faculty continue to strive to develop and evaluate innovative teaching strategies for improving students’ understanding and comprehension of course concepts and materials. A unique pedagogy described by authors in this issue is the use of concept mapping. This technique, sometimes referred to as mind mapping or care mapping, has been defined in the literature as a visual representation of one’s thoughts and ideas (Abel & Freeze, 2006; Hill, 2006), a diagram showing relationships among variables (Ferrario, 2004), and a graphic representation of interrelated information (Cahill & Fonteyn, 2000).

AUTHOR

Marsha Fonteyn, PhD, RN, OCN is Nurse Scientist, The Phyllis F. Cantor Center for Research in Nursing and Patient Care Services, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.

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