Journal of Nursing Education

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Major Articles 

Interactive Teaching: A Concept Analysis

Renee T. Ridley, MSN, APRN, BC, CFNP

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2007;46(5)
  • Posted May 1, 2007

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Interactive teaching is conceptually analyzed using the strategies of Walker and Avant to promote a common understanding of interactive teaching and to clearly explicate interactive teaching characteristics that will foster the construct validity of using interactive teaching in pedagogical research. In doing so, nurse researchers will be able to better understand and integrate interactive teaching into their research protocols, ultimately providing evidence for educators to use in determining the most effective teaching methods to incorporate into curricula. Interactive teaching is defined and examined using relevant sources; related concepts are analyzed and compared with these definitions. Antecedents, critical attributes, and consequences of interactive teaching are identified and applied in model, borderline, and contrary cases. Concluding remarks and suggestions are presented.

AUTHOR

Received: July 20, 2005

Accepted: January 20, 2006

Ms. Ridley is Lecturer, Murray State University, Department of Nursing, Murray, Kentucky, and a PhD student, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri.

The author gratefully acknowledges Margie Edel, EdD, Joanne Schneider, PhD, and Mary Stephen, PhD, at Saint Louis University for their expertise and encouragement.

Address correspondence to Renee T. Ridley, MSN, APRN, BC, CFNP, Lecturer, Murray State University, Department of Nursing, 120 Mason Hall, Murray, KY 42071; e-mail: renee.ridley@murraystate.edu.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Interactive teaching is conceptually analyzed using the strategies of Walker and Avant to promote a common understanding of interactive teaching and to clearly explicate interactive teaching characteristics that will foster the construct validity of using interactive teaching in pedagogical research. In doing so, nurse researchers will be able to better understand and integrate interactive teaching into their research protocols, ultimately providing evidence for educators to use in determining the most effective teaching methods to incorporate into curricula. Interactive teaching is defined and examined using relevant sources; related concepts are analyzed and compared with these definitions. Antecedents, critical attributes, and consequences of interactive teaching are identified and applied in model, borderline, and contrary cases. Concluding remarks and suggestions are presented.

AUTHOR

Received: July 20, 2005

Accepted: January 20, 2006

Ms. Ridley is Lecturer, Murray State University, Department of Nursing, Murray, Kentucky, and a PhD student, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri.

The author gratefully acknowledges Margie Edel, EdD, Joanne Schneider, PhD, and Mary Stephen, PhD, at Saint Louis University for their expertise and encouragement.

Address correspondence to Renee T. Ridley, MSN, APRN, BC, CFNP, Lecturer, Murray State University, Department of Nursing, 120 Mason Hall, Murray, KY 42071; e-mail: renee.ridley@murraystate.edu.

ABSTRACT

Interactive teaching is conceptually analyzed using the strategies of Walker and Avant to promote a common understanding of interactive teaching and to clearly explicate interactive teaching characteristics that will foster the construct validity of using interactive teaching in pedagogical research. In doing so, nurse researchers will be able to better understand and integrate interactive teaching into their research protocols, ultimately providing evidence for educators to use in determining the most effective teaching methods to incorporate into curricula. Interactive teaching is defined and examined using relevant sources; related concepts are analyzed and compared with these definitions. Antecedents, critical attributes, and consequences of interactive teaching are identified and applied in model, borderline, and contrary cases. Concluding remarks and suggestions are presented.

AUTHOR

Received: July 20, 2005

Accepted: January 20, 2006

Ms. Ridley is Lecturer, Murray State University, Department of Nursing, Murray, Kentucky, and a PhD student, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri.

The author gratefully acknowledges Margie Edel, EdD, Joanne Schneider, PhD, and Mary Stephen, PhD, at Saint Louis University for their expertise and encouragement.

Address correspondence to Renee T. Ridley, MSN, APRN, BC, CFNP, Lecturer, Murray State University, Department of Nursing, 120 Mason Hall, Murray, KY 42071; e-mail: renee.ridley@murraystate.edu.

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