Journal of Nursing Education

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Faculty Q&A 

Faculty Q&A

Abstract

Send in your questions for Faculty Q&A!

We want your questions not only about issues related to how to teach and instructional strategies, but also about other issues faced by faculty (both new and established). Here’s an example:

“I was shocked to have a student accuse me of sexism. The student is male and says there is an inherent bias against male students, as I have answered questions posed to me by female students when we were in the change room preparing for a clinical shift. How can I guard against this type of unintentional problem in the future?”

Here’s what you need to know:

  1. Questions need to be short and, preferably, include a specific scenario or examples.
  2. Submit questions that address practical issues faced by faculty and can be answered in a few paragraphs (see example above).
  3. E-mail your questions, along with your full name and credentials, to Karen G. Stanwood, ELS, Executive Editor, at kstanwood@slackinc.com.

EXCERPT

At our college, faculty members often co-teach to provide students with the greatest faculty expertise. One of the faculty with whom I teach frequently runs over her allotted class time, thus cutting into the time I have to deliver content. I have discussed this with her, but it seems to make no difference. How can this be handled tactfully?

Recently, a student directly witnessed another student cheating during one of my examinations. I sent the incident through the disciplinary process, and the accused student appealed. A group of students and my own peers overturned my determination of academic misconduct, even with an eyewitness. It seems that if you’re “only a student,” your word doesn’t matter if you are the accuser. What a hit on the Nurses’ Code of Ethics. How could this situation be handled differently?

Like so many nursing schools today, ours continues to hire adjunct clinical faculty who stay only a while and usually have little or no experience as teachers. It’s a revolving door! How can we help these faculty get up to speed quickly so they can teach effectively?

Abstract

Send in your questions for Faculty Q&A!

We want your questions not only about issues related to how to teach and instructional strategies, but also about other issues faced by faculty (both new and established). Here’s an example:

“I was shocked to have a student accuse me of sexism. The student is male and says there is an inherent bias against male students, as I have answered questions posed to me by female students when we were in the change room preparing for a clinical shift. How can I guard against this type of unintentional problem in the future?”

Here’s what you need to know:

  1. Questions need to be short and, preferably, include a specific scenario or examples.
  2. Submit questions that address practical issues faced by faculty and can be answered in a few paragraphs (see example above).
  3. E-mail your questions, along with your full name and credentials, to Karen G. Stanwood, ELS, Executive Editor, at kstanwood@slackinc.com.

EXCERPT

At our college, faculty members often co-teach to provide students with the greatest faculty expertise. One of the faculty with whom I teach frequently runs over her allotted class time, thus cutting into the time I have to deliver content. I have discussed this with her, but it seems to make no difference. How can this be handled tactfully?

Recently, a student directly witnessed another student cheating during one of my examinations. I sent the incident through the disciplinary process, and the accused student appealed. A group of students and my own peers overturned my determination of academic misconduct, even with an eyewitness. It seems that if you’re “only a student,” your word doesn’t matter if you are the accuser. What a hit on the Nurses’ Code of Ethics. How could this situation be handled differently?

Like so many nursing schools today, ours continues to hire adjunct clinical faculty who stay only a while and usually have little or no experience as teachers. It’s a revolving door! How can we help these faculty get up to speed quickly so they can teach effectively?

Send in your questions for Faculty Q&A!

We want your questions not only about issues related to how to teach and instructional strategies, but also about other issues faced by faculty (both new and established). Here’s an example:

“I was shocked to have a student accuse me of sexism. The student is male and says there is an inherent bias against male students, as I have answered questions posed to me by female students when we were in the change room preparing for a clinical shift. How can I guard against this type of unintentional problem in the future?”

Here’s what you need to know:

  1. Questions need to be short and, preferably, include a specific scenario or examples.
  2. Submit questions that address practical issues faced by faculty and can be answered in a few paragraphs (see example above).
  3. E-mail your questions, along with your full name and credentials, to Karen G. Stanwood, ELS, Executive Editor, at kstanwood@slackinc.com.

EXCERPT

At our college, faculty members often co-teach to provide students with the greatest faculty expertise. One of the faculty with whom I teach frequently runs over her allotted class time, thus cutting into the time I have to deliver content. I have discussed this with her, but it seems to make no difference. How can this be handled tactfully?

Recently, a student directly witnessed another student cheating during one of my examinations. I sent the incident through the disciplinary process, and the accused student appealed. A group of students and my own peers overturned my determination of academic misconduct, even with an eyewitness. It seems that if you’re “only a student,” your word doesn’t matter if you are the accuser. What a hit on the Nurses’ Code of Ethics. How could this situation be handled differently?

Like so many nursing schools today, ours continues to hire adjunct clinical faculty who stay only a while and usually have little or no experience as teachers. It’s a revolving door! How can we help these faculty get up to speed quickly so they can teach effectively?

10.3928/01484834-20070501-02

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