Journal of Nursing Education

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Educational Innovations 

Recruitment and Retention of Associate Degree Nursing Faculty

Marilyn S. Brady, PhD, RN

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Associate degree nursing (ADN) programs are influenced by many of the same factors affecting the recruitment and retention of nursing faculty in baccalaureate and graduate degree nursing programs. This article examines these factors along with strategies that have the potential to affect recruitment and retention. Factors affecting recruitment include the unique nature of the ADN educator role and salary. Factors affecting retention are salary, workload, and work hours. Beginning recruitment with students, while they are still enrolled in the program, and mentoring part-time clinical faculty are possible ways to recruit full-time faculty. Numerous initiatives designed to supplement the recruitment and retention efforts of individual nursing programs, developed by the National League for Nursing, are identified. Solutions to this shortage must be identified so there are adequate numbers of full-time faculty to achieve the goal of high-quality graduates who are committed to patient safety.

AUTHOR

Received: November 19, 2006

Accepted: December 7, 2006

Dr. Brady is Department Head, Nursing, Trident Technical College, Charleston, South Carolina.

Address correspondence to Marilyn S. Brady, PhD, RN, Department Head, Nursing, Trident Technical College, PO Box 118067, Charleston, SC 29423; e-mail: marilyn.brady@tridenttech.edu.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Associate degree nursing (ADN) programs are influenced by many of the same factors affecting the recruitment and retention of nursing faculty in baccalaureate and graduate degree nursing programs. This article examines these factors along with strategies that have the potential to affect recruitment and retention. Factors affecting recruitment include the unique nature of the ADN educator role and salary. Factors affecting retention are salary, workload, and work hours. Beginning recruitment with students, while they are still enrolled in the program, and mentoring part-time clinical faculty are possible ways to recruit full-time faculty. Numerous initiatives designed to supplement the recruitment and retention efforts of individual nursing programs, developed by the National League for Nursing, are identified. Solutions to this shortage must be identified so there are adequate numbers of full-time faculty to achieve the goal of high-quality graduates who are committed to patient safety.

AUTHOR

Received: November 19, 2006

Accepted: December 7, 2006

Dr. Brady is Department Head, Nursing, Trident Technical College, Charleston, South Carolina.

Address correspondence to Marilyn S. Brady, PhD, RN, Department Head, Nursing, Trident Technical College, PO Box 118067, Charleston, SC 29423; e-mail: marilyn.brady@tridenttech.edu.

ABSTRACT

Associate degree nursing (ADN) programs are influenced by many of the same factors affecting the recruitment and retention of nursing faculty in baccalaureate and graduate degree nursing programs. This article examines these factors along with strategies that have the potential to affect recruitment and retention. Factors affecting recruitment include the unique nature of the ADN educator role and salary. Factors affecting retention are salary, workload, and work hours. Beginning recruitment with students, while they are still enrolled in the program, and mentoring part-time clinical faculty are possible ways to recruit full-time faculty. Numerous initiatives designed to supplement the recruitment and retention efforts of individual nursing programs, developed by the National League for Nursing, are identified. Solutions to this shortage must be identified so there are adequate numbers of full-time faculty to achieve the goal of high-quality graduates who are committed to patient safety.

AUTHOR

Received: November 19, 2006

Accepted: December 7, 2006

Dr. Brady is Department Head, Nursing, Trident Technical College, Charleston, South Carolina.

Address correspondence to Marilyn S. Brady, PhD, RN, Department Head, Nursing, Trident Technical College, PO Box 118067, Charleston, SC 29423; e-mail: marilyn.brady@tridenttech.edu.

10.3928/01484834-20070401-10

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