Journal of Nursing Education

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Research Briefs 

Evidence-Based Strategies of Graduate Students to Achieve Success in a Hybrid Web-Based Course

David E. Kumrow, EdD, RN, CNS

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Web-based hybrid courses are gaining in popularity in institutions of higher learning for both undergraduate and graduate nursing education. The purpose of this study was to examine how predictive the five self-regulatory resource management strategies of time management, study environment, effort regulation, help seeking, and peer learning are in determining whether a student will be successful academically within a hybrid learning environment. The sample consisted of 38 graduate nursing students enrolled in two sections—one hybrid and the other lecture—of a health care economics course at a major, public, urban, 4-year university. The results of the study revealed that students in the hybrid section had significantly higher end-of-course grades and a significantly higher favorable rating (affective behavior) of their method of instruction. Of the five resource management strategies examined, only help seeking showed a significant correlation with end-of-course grades in both sections.

AUTHOR

Received: May 26, 2005

Accepted: September 21, 2005

Dr. Kumrow is Associate Professor, Department of Nursing, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, California.

Address correspondence to David E. Kumrow, EdD, RN, CNS, Associate Professor, Department of Nursing, California State University, Long Beach, 1250 Bellflower Boulevard, Long Beach, CA 90840; e-mail: dkumrow@csulb.edu.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Web-based hybrid courses are gaining in popularity in institutions of higher learning for both undergraduate and graduate nursing education. The purpose of this study was to examine how predictive the five self-regulatory resource management strategies of time management, study environment, effort regulation, help seeking, and peer learning are in determining whether a student will be successful academically within a hybrid learning environment. The sample consisted of 38 graduate nursing students enrolled in two sections—one hybrid and the other lecture—of a health care economics course at a major, public, urban, 4-year university. The results of the study revealed that students in the hybrid section had significantly higher end-of-course grades and a significantly higher favorable rating (affective behavior) of their method of instruction. Of the five resource management strategies examined, only help seeking showed a significant correlation with end-of-course grades in both sections.

AUTHOR

Received: May 26, 2005

Accepted: September 21, 2005

Dr. Kumrow is Associate Professor, Department of Nursing, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, California.

Address correspondence to David E. Kumrow, EdD, RN, CNS, Associate Professor, Department of Nursing, California State University, Long Beach, 1250 Bellflower Boulevard, Long Beach, CA 90840; e-mail: dkumrow@csulb.edu.

ABSTRACT

Web-based hybrid courses are gaining in popularity in institutions of higher learning for both undergraduate and graduate nursing education. The purpose of this study was to examine how predictive the five self-regulatory resource management strategies of time management, study environment, effort regulation, help seeking, and peer learning are in determining whether a student will be successful academically within a hybrid learning environment. The sample consisted of 38 graduate nursing students enrolled in two sections—one hybrid and the other lecture—of a health care economics course at a major, public, urban, 4-year university. The results of the study revealed that students in the hybrid section had significantly higher end-of-course grades and a significantly higher favorable rating (affective behavior) of their method of instruction. Of the five resource management strategies examined, only help seeking showed a significant correlation with end-of-course grades in both sections.

AUTHOR

Received: May 26, 2005

Accepted: September 21, 2005

Dr. Kumrow is Associate Professor, Department of Nursing, California State University, Long Beach, Long Beach, California.

Address correspondence to David E. Kumrow, EdD, RN, CNS, Associate Professor, Department of Nursing, California State University, Long Beach, 1250 Bellflower Boulevard, Long Beach, CA 90840; e-mail: dkumrow@csulb.edu.

10.3928/01484834-20070301-10

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