Journal of Nursing Education

The articles prior to January 2012 are part of the back file collection and are not available with a current paid subscription. To access the article, you may purchase it or purchase the complete back file collection here

Major Articles 

Cultural Competence Revisited: Nursing Students with Disabilities

Beth Marks, PhD, RN

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2007;46(2)
  • Posted February 1, 2007

Abstract

ABSTRACT

The demographic profile of students in nursing schools is changing in relation to many different cultural backgrounds. Despite the potential for students with disabilities to enrich the nursing profession, nurse educators may be perpetuating historical attitudes, values, and practices that exclude students with disabilities from gaining admission or identifying themselves as people with disabilities. Educators in nursing schools continue to ask whether people with disabilities have a place in the nursing profession, while the more salient question is, “When will people with disabilities have a place in the nursing profession?” More important, as we create environments that welcome students with disabilities into the nursing profession, how does the quality of nursing care improve and become more appropriate for people with different cultural experiences? The purpose of this article is to present the value of recruiting students with disabilities into nursing schools in order to enhance culturally competent nursing care.

AUTHOR

Received: May 17, 2005

Accepted: December 6, 2005

Dr. Marks is Research Assistant Professor, Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.

Preparation of this article was supported in part by the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Aging with Developmental Disabilities, through the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, Grant No. H133B980046.

The author wishes to thank Kathryn B. Lemley, PhD, RN, Jasmina Sisirak, MPH, and Bronwynne Evans, PhD, RN, for their thoughtful reviews and insightful feedback in preparing the manuscript.

Address correspondence to Beth Marks, PhD, RN, Research Assistant Professor, Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1640 West Roosevelt Road, Chicago, IL 60608; e-mail: bmarks1@uic.edu.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

The demographic profile of students in nursing schools is changing in relation to many different cultural backgrounds. Despite the potential for students with disabilities to enrich the nursing profession, nurse educators may be perpetuating historical attitudes, values, and practices that exclude students with disabilities from gaining admission or identifying themselves as people with disabilities. Educators in nursing schools continue to ask whether people with disabilities have a place in the nursing profession, while the more salient question is, “When will people with disabilities have a place in the nursing profession?” More important, as we create environments that welcome students with disabilities into the nursing profession, how does the quality of nursing care improve and become more appropriate for people with different cultural experiences? The purpose of this article is to present the value of recruiting students with disabilities into nursing schools in order to enhance culturally competent nursing care.

AUTHOR

Received: May 17, 2005

Accepted: December 6, 2005

Dr. Marks is Research Assistant Professor, Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.

Preparation of this article was supported in part by the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Aging with Developmental Disabilities, through the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, Grant No. H133B980046.

The author wishes to thank Kathryn B. Lemley, PhD, RN, Jasmina Sisirak, MPH, and Bronwynne Evans, PhD, RN, for their thoughtful reviews and insightful feedback in preparing the manuscript.

Address correspondence to Beth Marks, PhD, RN, Research Assistant Professor, Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1640 West Roosevelt Road, Chicago, IL 60608; e-mail: bmarks1@uic.edu.

ABSTRACT

The demographic profile of students in nursing schools is changing in relation to many different cultural backgrounds. Despite the potential for students with disabilities to enrich the nursing profession, nurse educators may be perpetuating historical attitudes, values, and practices that exclude students with disabilities from gaining admission or identifying themselves as people with disabilities. Educators in nursing schools continue to ask whether people with disabilities have a place in the nursing profession, while the more salient question is, “When will people with disabilities have a place in the nursing profession?” More important, as we create environments that welcome students with disabilities into the nursing profession, how does the quality of nursing care improve and become more appropriate for people with different cultural experiences? The purpose of this article is to present the value of recruiting students with disabilities into nursing schools in order to enhance culturally competent nursing care.

AUTHOR

Received: May 17, 2005

Accepted: December 6, 2005

Dr. Marks is Research Assistant Professor, Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.

Preparation of this article was supported in part by the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Aging with Developmental Disabilities, through the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, Grant No. H133B980046.

The author wishes to thank Kathryn B. Lemley, PhD, RN, Jasmina Sisirak, MPH, and Bronwynne Evans, PhD, RN, for their thoughtful reviews and insightful feedback in preparing the manuscript.

Address correspondence to Beth Marks, PhD, RN, Research Assistant Professor, Department of Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1640 West Roosevelt Road, Chicago, IL 60608; e-mail: bmarks1@uic.edu.

Sign up to receive

Journal E-contents