Journal of Nursing Education

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Major Articles 

Emancipatory Teaching-Learning Philosophy and Practice Education in Acute Care: Navigating Tensions

Carla E. Randall, PhD, RN; Betty Tate, MN, RN; Mary Lougheed, MN, RN

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2007;46(2)
  • Posted February 1, 2007

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Much has been written in the nursing literature about the intentions and desires of a transformatory movement in nursing education. However, dialogue and critique related to actual implementation of a curriculum revolution begun in the late 1980s are lacking. The acute care context of nursing practice holds particular challenges for faculty teaching in an emancipatory curriculum. How do faculty implement a philosophy of teaching-learning congruent with the curriculum revolution, in the context of an acute care setting that privileges empirical knowledge and values a behaviorist paradigm? In this article, we provide an example of one teaching approach grounded in an emancipatory ideology: critical questioning. We also discuss some of the tensions we associate with teaching-learning in an acute care context and our experiences of navigating these tensions.

AUTHORS

Received: September 18, 2004

Accepted: September 30, 2005

Dr. Randall is Assistant Professor, University of Southern Maine, College of Nursing and Health Professions, Lewiston, Maine; Ms. Tate is Instructor, North Island College, Courtenay, British Columbia, Canada; and Ms. Lougheed is Senior Instructor, University of Victoria, School of Nursing, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.

Address correspondence to Carla E. Randall, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, University of Southern Maine, College of Nursing and Health Professions, 51 Westminster Street, 162H, Lewiston, ME 04240; e-mail: randallc@usm.maine.edu.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Much has been written in the nursing literature about the intentions and desires of a transformatory movement in nursing education. However, dialogue and critique related to actual implementation of a curriculum revolution begun in the late 1980s are lacking. The acute care context of nursing practice holds particular challenges for faculty teaching in an emancipatory curriculum. How do faculty implement a philosophy of teaching-learning congruent with the curriculum revolution, in the context of an acute care setting that privileges empirical knowledge and values a behaviorist paradigm? In this article, we provide an example of one teaching approach grounded in an emancipatory ideology: critical questioning. We also discuss some of the tensions we associate with teaching-learning in an acute care context and our experiences of navigating these tensions.

AUTHORS

Received: September 18, 2004

Accepted: September 30, 2005

Dr. Randall is Assistant Professor, University of Southern Maine, College of Nursing and Health Professions, Lewiston, Maine; Ms. Tate is Instructor, North Island College, Courtenay, British Columbia, Canada; and Ms. Lougheed is Senior Instructor, University of Victoria, School of Nursing, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.

Address correspondence to Carla E. Randall, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, University of Southern Maine, College of Nursing and Health Professions, 51 Westminster Street, 162H, Lewiston, ME 04240; e-mail: randallc@usm.maine.edu.

ABSTRACT

Much has been written in the nursing literature about the intentions and desires of a transformatory movement in nursing education. However, dialogue and critique related to actual implementation of a curriculum revolution begun in the late 1980s are lacking. The acute care context of nursing practice holds particular challenges for faculty teaching in an emancipatory curriculum. How do faculty implement a philosophy of teaching-learning congruent with the curriculum revolution, in the context of an acute care setting that privileges empirical knowledge and values a behaviorist paradigm? In this article, we provide an example of one teaching approach grounded in an emancipatory ideology: critical questioning. We also discuss some of the tensions we associate with teaching-learning in an acute care context and our experiences of navigating these tensions.

AUTHORS

Received: September 18, 2004

Accepted: September 30, 2005

Dr. Randall is Assistant Professor, University of Southern Maine, College of Nursing and Health Professions, Lewiston, Maine; Ms. Tate is Instructor, North Island College, Courtenay, British Columbia, Canada; and Ms. Lougheed is Senior Instructor, University of Victoria, School of Nursing, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.

Address correspondence to Carla E. Randall, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, University of Southern Maine, College of Nursing and Health Professions, 51 Westminster Street, 162H, Lewiston, ME 04240; e-mail: randallc@usm.maine.edu.

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