Journal of Nursing Education

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Major Articles 

Psychological Empowerment and Use of Empowering Teaching Behaviors Among Baccalaureate Nursing Faculty

Vera C. Brancato, EdD, RN, BC

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2007;46(12)
  • Posted December 1, 2007

Abstract

ABSTRACT

This descriptive correlational study surveyed baccalaureate nursing faculty members about their use of empowering teaching behaviors, their psychological empowerment (i.e., perception of self in relation to one’s work role), and the relationships among their use of empowering teaching behaviors, their psychological empowerment, and selected demographic characteristics. The random national sample consisted of 531 full-time faculty members (response rate = 75%) who taught in baccalaureate nursing programs accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission. Empowering teaching behaviors were measured using Part II of the Status and Promotion of Professional Nursing Practice Questionnaire. The average number of empowering teaching behaviors was 19.5 (of a possible 40), indicating limited use. Psychological empowerment was measured using the Psychological Empowerment Instrument. The mean score was 92.38 (of a possible 112), indicating that faculty perceived psychological empowerment in regard to their work role. However, nearly 25% of the faculty surveyed reported they had little influence over decision making processes within their department.

AUTHOR

Received: October 2, 2005

Accepted: January 25, 2006

At the time this article was written, Dr. Brancato was Professor and Director, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching, Kutztown University, Kutztown, Pennsylvania. Dr. Brancato is currently Professor and Chairperson, Department of Academic Advisement, Kutztown University, Kutztown, Pennsylvania.

Address correspondence to Vera C. Brancato, EdD, RN, BC, Professor and Chairperson, Department of Academic Advisement, Kutztown University, Kutztown, PA 19530; e-mail: brancato@kutztown.edu.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

This descriptive correlational study surveyed baccalaureate nursing faculty members about their use of empowering teaching behaviors, their psychological empowerment (i.e., perception of self in relation to one’s work role), and the relationships among their use of empowering teaching behaviors, their psychological empowerment, and selected demographic characteristics. The random national sample consisted of 531 full-time faculty members (response rate = 75%) who taught in baccalaureate nursing programs accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission. Empowering teaching behaviors were measured using Part II of the Status and Promotion of Professional Nursing Practice Questionnaire. The average number of empowering teaching behaviors was 19.5 (of a possible 40), indicating limited use. Psychological empowerment was measured using the Psychological Empowerment Instrument. The mean score was 92.38 (of a possible 112), indicating that faculty perceived psychological empowerment in regard to their work role. However, nearly 25% of the faculty surveyed reported they had little influence over decision making processes within their department.

AUTHOR

Received: October 2, 2005

Accepted: January 25, 2006

At the time this article was written, Dr. Brancato was Professor and Director, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching, Kutztown University, Kutztown, Pennsylvania. Dr. Brancato is currently Professor and Chairperson, Department of Academic Advisement, Kutztown University, Kutztown, Pennsylvania.

Address correspondence to Vera C. Brancato, EdD, RN, BC, Professor and Chairperson, Department of Academic Advisement, Kutztown University, Kutztown, PA 19530; e-mail: brancato@kutztown.edu.

ABSTRACT

This descriptive correlational study surveyed baccalaureate nursing faculty members about their use of empowering teaching behaviors, their psychological empowerment (i.e., perception of self in relation to one’s work role), and the relationships among their use of empowering teaching behaviors, their psychological empowerment, and selected demographic characteristics. The random national sample consisted of 531 full-time faculty members (response rate = 75%) who taught in baccalaureate nursing programs accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission. Empowering teaching behaviors were measured using Part II of the Status and Promotion of Professional Nursing Practice Questionnaire. The average number of empowering teaching behaviors was 19.5 (of a possible 40), indicating limited use. Psychological empowerment was measured using the Psychological Empowerment Instrument. The mean score was 92.38 (of a possible 112), indicating that faculty perceived psychological empowerment in regard to their work role. However, nearly 25% of the faculty surveyed reported they had little influence over decision making processes within their department.

AUTHOR

Received: October 2, 2005

Accepted: January 25, 2006

At the time this article was written, Dr. Brancato was Professor and Director, Center for the Enhancement of Teaching, Kutztown University, Kutztown, Pennsylvania. Dr. Brancato is currently Professor and Chairperson, Department of Academic Advisement, Kutztown University, Kutztown, Pennsylvania.

Address correspondence to Vera C. Brancato, EdD, RN, BC, Professor and Chairperson, Department of Academic Advisement, Kutztown University, Kutztown, PA 19530; e-mail: brancato@kutztown.edu.

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