Journal of Nursing Education

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Educational Innovations 

Engaging Students and Faculty with Diverse First-Person Experiences: Use of an Interpretive Research Group

Mona M. Shattell, PhD, RN

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2007;46(12)
  • Posted December 1, 2007

Abstract

ABSTRACT

This article is about a teaching strategy that operationalizes an aspect of the National League for Nurses’ position statement “Transforming Nursing Education” and the Institute of Medicine’s report “Crossing the Quality Chasm.” Engaging students with patients’ first-person experiences related to health and illness and their experiences with health care can help students learn about the multiplicity of views on experience, help them focus on the patient as an individual, and heed the call for more patient-centered care. This article describes how an interpretive research group can be used to develop these skills by teaching undergraduate nursing students, in a caring, open environment, what life is like from the patient’s perspective.

AUTHOR

Received: January 19, 2006

Accepted: April 12, 2006

Dr. Shattell is Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, School of Nursing, Greensboro, North Carolina.

The author thanks her nursing students at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, who have helped her envision, shape, and continue to grow the Interpretive Research Group; and her former and current colleagues, who continue to conduct or participate in the Group: Beverly Hogan, Lillie Granger, Cheryl McNeill, Robin Bartlett, Brenda Weatherington, and Eileen Rossen. She also thanks Sandra Thomas for introducing her to phenomenology and Elizabeth Tornquist for her comments on an earlier version of this manuscript.

Address correspondence to Mona M. Shattell, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, School of Nursing, PO Box 26170, Moore Building 320, Greensboro, NC 27402; e-mail: mona_shattell@uncg.edu.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

This article is about a teaching strategy that operationalizes an aspect of the National League for Nurses’ position statement “Transforming Nursing Education” and the Institute of Medicine’s report “Crossing the Quality Chasm.” Engaging students with patients’ first-person experiences related to health and illness and their experiences with health care can help students learn about the multiplicity of views on experience, help them focus on the patient as an individual, and heed the call for more patient-centered care. This article describes how an interpretive research group can be used to develop these skills by teaching undergraduate nursing students, in a caring, open environment, what life is like from the patient’s perspective.

AUTHOR

Received: January 19, 2006

Accepted: April 12, 2006

Dr. Shattell is Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, School of Nursing, Greensboro, North Carolina.

The author thanks her nursing students at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, who have helped her envision, shape, and continue to grow the Interpretive Research Group; and her former and current colleagues, who continue to conduct or participate in the Group: Beverly Hogan, Lillie Granger, Cheryl McNeill, Robin Bartlett, Brenda Weatherington, and Eileen Rossen. She also thanks Sandra Thomas for introducing her to phenomenology and Elizabeth Tornquist for her comments on an earlier version of this manuscript.

Address correspondence to Mona M. Shattell, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, School of Nursing, PO Box 26170, Moore Building 320, Greensboro, NC 27402; e-mail: mona_shattell@uncg.edu.

ABSTRACT

This article is about a teaching strategy that operationalizes an aspect of the National League for Nurses’ position statement “Transforming Nursing Education” and the Institute of Medicine’s report “Crossing the Quality Chasm.” Engaging students with patients’ first-person experiences related to health and illness and their experiences with health care can help students learn about the multiplicity of views on experience, help them focus on the patient as an individual, and heed the call for more patient-centered care. This article describes how an interpretive research group can be used to develop these skills by teaching undergraduate nursing students, in a caring, open environment, what life is like from the patient’s perspective.

AUTHOR

Received: January 19, 2006

Accepted: April 12, 2006

Dr. Shattell is Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, School of Nursing, Greensboro, North Carolina.

The author thanks her nursing students at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, who have helped her envision, shape, and continue to grow the Interpretive Research Group; and her former and current colleagues, who continue to conduct or participate in the Group: Beverly Hogan, Lillie Granger, Cheryl McNeill, Robin Bartlett, Brenda Weatherington, and Eileen Rossen. She also thanks Sandra Thomas for introducing her to phenomenology and Elizabeth Tornquist for her comments on an earlier version of this manuscript.

Address correspondence to Mona M. Shattell, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, School of Nursing, PO Box 26170, Moore Building 320, Greensboro, NC 27402; e-mail: mona_shattell@uncg.edu.

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