Journal of Nursing Education

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Guest Editorial 

On Becoming a Nurse

Roberta J. Emerson, PhD, RN

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2007;46(11)
  • Posted November 1, 2007

Abstract

EXCERPT

It was just one of those snippets of conversation, overheard in passing, but it induced the same physical and emotional response as fingernails across a chalkboard. A colleague, introducing herself to her new class of students, began discussing her own career development by saying, “I started my nursing training…” Perhaps it was an appropriate term in the mid-19th century when Florence Nightingale brought nursing care to the forefront of society’s consciousness, but training is no longer the appropriate appellation for the process of becoming a nurse.

AUTHOR

Roberta J. Emerson, PhD, RN is CCRN Emeritus and Associate Professor, Intercollegiate College of Nursing, Washington State University, Spokane, Washington.

Abstract

EXCERPT

It was just one of those snippets of conversation, overheard in passing, but it induced the same physical and emotional response as fingernails across a chalkboard. A colleague, introducing herself to her new class of students, began discussing her own career development by saying, “I started my nursing training…” Perhaps it was an appropriate term in the mid-19th century when Florence Nightingale brought nursing care to the forefront of society’s consciousness, but training is no longer the appropriate appellation for the process of becoming a nurse.

AUTHOR

Roberta J. Emerson, PhD, RN is CCRN Emeritus and Associate Professor, Intercollegiate College of Nursing, Washington State University, Spokane, Washington.

EXCERPT

It was just one of those snippets of conversation, overheard in passing, but it induced the same physical and emotional response as fingernails across a chalkboard. A colleague, introducing herself to her new class of students, began discussing her own career development by saying, “I started my nursing training…” Perhaps it was an appropriate term in the mid-19th century when Florence Nightingale brought nursing care to the forefront of society’s consciousness, but training is no longer the appropriate appellation for the process of becoming a nurse.

AUTHOR

Roberta J. Emerson, PhD, RN is CCRN Emeritus and Associate Professor, Intercollegiate College of Nursing, Washington State University, Spokane, Washington.

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