Journal of Nursing Education

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Educational Innovations 

Guide for Reflection Using the Clinical Judgment Model

Ann Nielsen, MN, RN; Susan Stragnell, MS, RN; Priscilla Jester, MN, RN

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2007;46(11)
  • Posted November 1, 2007

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Reflection is widely used in nursing education to facilitate learning. Student writing and thinking, however, is not always of the quality faculty expect or desire. This project originated from concern about the quality of student descriptions of clinical experiences in a senior-level precepted clinical practicum. Providing students with more structure and guidance for consideration of clinical experiences, as well as thoughtful faculty feedback, can potentially enhance thinking and move students toward increased nursing competence. In this learning activity, a structured guide was used to facilitate reflection. The accompanying rubric was used to evaluate and communicate about progress in the development of student thinking and clinical judgment.

AUTHORS

Received: February 4, 2006

Accepted: April 12, 2006

Ms. Nielsen and Ms. Jester are Instructors, Oregon Health & Science University, School of Nursing, and Ms. Stragnell is Instructor, University of Portland, School of Nursing, Portland, Oregon. Ms. Jester is also Community Health Nurse, Multnomah County Health Department, Portland, Oregon.

Address correspondence to Ann Nielsen, MN, RN, Instructor, Oregon Health & Science University, School of Nursing, 3455 SW U.S. Veterans Hospital Road, Portland, OR 97239; e-mail: nielsena@ohsu.edu.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Reflection is widely used in nursing education to facilitate learning. Student writing and thinking, however, is not always of the quality faculty expect or desire. This project originated from concern about the quality of student descriptions of clinical experiences in a senior-level precepted clinical practicum. Providing students with more structure and guidance for consideration of clinical experiences, as well as thoughtful faculty feedback, can potentially enhance thinking and move students toward increased nursing competence. In this learning activity, a structured guide was used to facilitate reflection. The accompanying rubric was used to evaluate and communicate about progress in the development of student thinking and clinical judgment.

AUTHORS

Received: February 4, 2006

Accepted: April 12, 2006

Ms. Nielsen and Ms. Jester are Instructors, Oregon Health & Science University, School of Nursing, and Ms. Stragnell is Instructor, University of Portland, School of Nursing, Portland, Oregon. Ms. Jester is also Community Health Nurse, Multnomah County Health Department, Portland, Oregon.

Address correspondence to Ann Nielsen, MN, RN, Instructor, Oregon Health & Science University, School of Nursing, 3455 SW U.S. Veterans Hospital Road, Portland, OR 97239; e-mail: nielsena@ohsu.edu.

ABSTRACT

Reflection is widely used in nursing education to facilitate learning. Student writing and thinking, however, is not always of the quality faculty expect or desire. This project originated from concern about the quality of student descriptions of clinical experiences in a senior-level precepted clinical practicum. Providing students with more structure and guidance for consideration of clinical experiences, as well as thoughtful faculty feedback, can potentially enhance thinking and move students toward increased nursing competence. In this learning activity, a structured guide was used to facilitate reflection. The accompanying rubric was used to evaluate and communicate about progress in the development of student thinking and clinical judgment.

AUTHORS

Received: February 4, 2006

Accepted: April 12, 2006

Ms. Nielsen and Ms. Jester are Instructors, Oregon Health & Science University, School of Nursing, and Ms. Stragnell is Instructor, University of Portland, School of Nursing, Portland, Oregon. Ms. Jester is also Community Health Nurse, Multnomah County Health Department, Portland, Oregon.

Address correspondence to Ann Nielsen, MN, RN, Instructor, Oregon Health & Science University, School of Nursing, 3455 SW U.S. Veterans Hospital Road, Portland, OR 97239; e-mail: nielsena@ohsu.edu.

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