Journal of Nursing Education

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Educational Innovations 

Windows Open: Humanities Teaching During Undergraduate Clinical Experiences

Suzanne Marnocha, PhD, CCRN; Mark Marnocha, PhD

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2007;46(11)
  • Posted November 1, 2007

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Humanities teaching in nursing education has the potential to facilitate professional growth and improve patient care. To fit into crowded curricula and to have the greatest effect, humanities teaching needs to be concise and clinically relevant. We describe a humanities educational program, incorporated within undergraduate nursing students’ first acute care clinical semester, that uses expressive and didactic methods supported by educational, clinical, or theoretical evidence. Student evaluations of the educational program were uniformly favorable. The range and depth of students’ feedback demonstrate the educational and emotional effects that are possible when humanities content is taught during clinical experiences.

AUTHORS

Received: January 4, 2006

Accepted: May 11, 2006

Dr. Suzanne Marnocha is Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, College of Nursing, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and Dr. Mark Marnocha is Clinical Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, at Fox Valley Family Medicine, Appleton, Wisconsin.

Address correspondence to Suzanne Marnocha, PhD, CCRN, Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, College of Nursing, 800 Algoma Boulevard, Oshkosh, WI 54901; e-mail: marnocha@uwosh.edu.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Humanities teaching in nursing education has the potential to facilitate professional growth and improve patient care. To fit into crowded curricula and to have the greatest effect, humanities teaching needs to be concise and clinically relevant. We describe a humanities educational program, incorporated within undergraduate nursing students’ first acute care clinical semester, that uses expressive and didactic methods supported by educational, clinical, or theoretical evidence. Student evaluations of the educational program were uniformly favorable. The range and depth of students’ feedback demonstrate the educational and emotional effects that are possible when humanities content is taught during clinical experiences.

AUTHORS

Received: January 4, 2006

Accepted: May 11, 2006

Dr. Suzanne Marnocha is Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, College of Nursing, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and Dr. Mark Marnocha is Clinical Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, at Fox Valley Family Medicine, Appleton, Wisconsin.

Address correspondence to Suzanne Marnocha, PhD, CCRN, Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, College of Nursing, 800 Algoma Boulevard, Oshkosh, WI 54901; e-mail: marnocha@uwosh.edu.

ABSTRACT

Humanities teaching in nursing education has the potential to facilitate professional growth and improve patient care. To fit into crowded curricula and to have the greatest effect, humanities teaching needs to be concise and clinically relevant. We describe a humanities educational program, incorporated within undergraduate nursing students’ first acute care clinical semester, that uses expressive and didactic methods supported by educational, clinical, or theoretical evidence. Student evaluations of the educational program were uniformly favorable. The range and depth of students’ feedback demonstrate the educational and emotional effects that are possible when humanities content is taught during clinical experiences.

AUTHORS

Received: January 4, 2006

Accepted: May 11, 2006

Dr. Suzanne Marnocha is Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, College of Nursing, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and Dr. Mark Marnocha is Clinical Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, at Fox Valley Family Medicine, Appleton, Wisconsin.

Address correspondence to Suzanne Marnocha, PhD, CCRN, Associate Professor, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, College of Nursing, 800 Algoma Boulevard, Oshkosh, WI 54901; e-mail: marnocha@uwosh.edu.

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