Journal of Nursing Education

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Major Articles 

Evaluating a Web–Enhanced Bachelor of Nursing Curriculum: Perspectives of Third–Year Students

Debra K. Creedy, PhD; Marion Mitchell, PhD; Philippa Seaton–Sykes, PhD; Marie Cooke, PhD; Elizabeth Patterson, PhD; Christine Purcell, PhD; Patricia Weeks, PhD

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2007;46(10)
  • Posted October 1, 2007

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Little is known about nursing students’ information literacy skills and perceptions of Web–enhanced educational approaches. This study examined graduating Bachelor of Nursing (BN) students’ perceptions of a Web–enhanced learning environment, their computer literacy skills, and use of technology, and how these influenced their satisfaction. This Australian survey produced a 64% (n = 170) response rate. The 3–year BN program provides Web–enhanced learning opportunities by incorporating online activities and content such as quizzes, videos, and virtual laboratories that augment on–campus and off–campus learning approaches. Upon graduation, 61.4% of the students reported having competent information literacy skills. The quality and usefulness of the Web–enhanced material was rated fair to above average. The students’ perception of technical and faculty support for Web–enhanced learning was low. Overall satisfaction with the Web–enhanced program was associated with level of information technology (IT) skills and perceived quality and usefulness of the Internet material. A regression analysis of factors contributing to students’ overall satisfaction of a Web–enhanced learning environment (IT literacy skills, access, and perceived quality, usefulness, and support) accounted for 18.5% of variance. As more nursing programs use Web–based resources, greater attention should be given to the initial assessment and development of students’ information literacy skills. Students with good IT skills are more likely to perceive Web–enhanced material as useful.

AUTHORS

Received: December 8, 2004

Accepted: January 20, 2006

Professor Creedy is Dean, Dr. Mitchell is Deputy Head of School (Logan), Dr. Seaton–Sykes is Web Learning Coordinator, Dr. Cooke is Deputy Head of School, Associate Professor Patterson is Head of School, Dr. Purcell is Senior Lecturer, Research Centre for Clinical and Community Practice Innovation, School of Nursing & Midwifery, and Dr. Weeks is Educational Designer, Griffith Flexible Learning Assistance Service, Griffith Health, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia.

This study was supported by the Griffith University DVC Strategic Teaching–Learning Fund.

Address correspondence to Debra K. Creedy, PhD, Dean, Research Centre for Clinical and Community Practice Innovation, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Griffith Health, Griffith University, PMB 50 Gold Coast Mail Centre, Queensland 9726, Australia; e–mail: D.Creedy@griffith.edu.au.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Little is known about nursing students’ information literacy skills and perceptions of Web–enhanced educational approaches. This study examined graduating Bachelor of Nursing (BN) students’ perceptions of a Web–enhanced learning environment, their computer literacy skills, and use of technology, and how these influenced their satisfaction. This Australian survey produced a 64% (n = 170) response rate. The 3–year BN program provides Web–enhanced learning opportunities by incorporating online activities and content such as quizzes, videos, and virtual laboratories that augment on–campus and off–campus learning approaches. Upon graduation, 61.4% of the students reported having competent information literacy skills. The quality and usefulness of the Web–enhanced material was rated fair to above average. The students’ perception of technical and faculty support for Web–enhanced learning was low. Overall satisfaction with the Web–enhanced program was associated with level of information technology (IT) skills and perceived quality and usefulness of the Internet material. A regression analysis of factors contributing to students’ overall satisfaction of a Web–enhanced learning environment (IT literacy skills, access, and perceived quality, usefulness, and support) accounted for 18.5% of variance. As more nursing programs use Web–based resources, greater attention should be given to the initial assessment and development of students’ information literacy skills. Students with good IT skills are more likely to perceive Web–enhanced material as useful.

AUTHORS

Received: December 8, 2004

Accepted: January 20, 2006

Professor Creedy is Dean, Dr. Mitchell is Deputy Head of School (Logan), Dr. Seaton–Sykes is Web Learning Coordinator, Dr. Cooke is Deputy Head of School, Associate Professor Patterson is Head of School, Dr. Purcell is Senior Lecturer, Research Centre for Clinical and Community Practice Innovation, School of Nursing & Midwifery, and Dr. Weeks is Educational Designer, Griffith Flexible Learning Assistance Service, Griffith Health, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia.

This study was supported by the Griffith University DVC Strategic Teaching–Learning Fund.

Address correspondence to Debra K. Creedy, PhD, Dean, Research Centre for Clinical and Community Practice Innovation, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Griffith Health, Griffith University, PMB 50 Gold Coast Mail Centre, Queensland 9726, Australia; e–mail: D.Creedy@griffith.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

Little is known about nursing students’ information literacy skills and perceptions of Web–enhanced educational approaches. This study examined graduating Bachelor of Nursing (BN) students’ perceptions of a Web–enhanced learning environment, their computer literacy skills, and use of technology, and how these influenced their satisfaction. This Australian survey produced a 64% (n = 170) response rate. The 3–year BN program provides Web–enhanced learning opportunities by incorporating online activities and content such as quizzes, videos, and virtual laboratories that augment on–campus and off–campus learning approaches. Upon graduation, 61.4% of the students reported having competent information literacy skills. The quality and usefulness of the Web–enhanced material was rated fair to above average. The students’ perception of technical and faculty support for Web–enhanced learning was low. Overall satisfaction with the Web–enhanced program was associated with level of information technology (IT) skills and perceived quality and usefulness of the Internet material. A regression analysis of factors contributing to students’ overall satisfaction of a Web–enhanced learning environment (IT literacy skills, access, and perceived quality, usefulness, and support) accounted for 18.5% of variance. As more nursing programs use Web–based resources, greater attention should be given to the initial assessment and development of students’ information literacy skills. Students with good IT skills are more likely to perceive Web–enhanced material as useful.

AUTHORS

Received: December 8, 2004

Accepted: January 20, 2006

Professor Creedy is Dean, Dr. Mitchell is Deputy Head of School (Logan), Dr. Seaton–Sykes is Web Learning Coordinator, Dr. Cooke is Deputy Head of School, Associate Professor Patterson is Head of School, Dr. Purcell is Senior Lecturer, Research Centre for Clinical and Community Practice Innovation, School of Nursing & Midwifery, and Dr. Weeks is Educational Designer, Griffith Flexible Learning Assistance Service, Griffith Health, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia.

This study was supported by the Griffith University DVC Strategic Teaching–Learning Fund.

Address correspondence to Debra K. Creedy, PhD, Dean, Research Centre for Clinical and Community Practice Innovation, School of Nursing & Midwifery, Griffith Health, Griffith University, PMB 50 Gold Coast Mail Centre, Queensland 9726, Australia; e–mail: D.Creedy@griffith.edu.au.

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