Journal of Nursing Education

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Editorial 

Our Misleading Leading Edge

Janis P. Bellack, PhD, RN, FAAN

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2007;46(10)
  • Posted October 1, 2007

Abstract

EXCERPT

By all counts, the nursing workforce shortage is growing and will reach critical proportions beginning in 2010, and will continue to worsen at least through 2020 (National Center for Health Workforce Analysis, 2000). In addition, by 2010, the workforce shortage will be the largest ever in American history for the nursing profession. Only in Hawaii, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, and New Hampshire is the supply of RNs projected to meet the demand in 2020. All other states will experience significant shortfalls. Wyoming is predicted to experience the worst shortage, with a 56% shortfall projected for 2015 and an alarming 63% projected for 2020 (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2002). The wide variability in these projections likely results from variations in general population demographics and density, the number and size of health care services that employ RNs, the locations and capacity of nursing education programs to graduate the needed numbers of nurses, and the demographics of each state’s nursing workforce.

Abstract

EXCERPT

By all counts, the nursing workforce shortage is growing and will reach critical proportions beginning in 2010, and will continue to worsen at least through 2020 (National Center for Health Workforce Analysis, 2000). In addition, by 2010, the workforce shortage will be the largest ever in American history for the nursing profession. Only in Hawaii, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, and New Hampshire is the supply of RNs projected to meet the demand in 2020. All other states will experience significant shortfalls. Wyoming is predicted to experience the worst shortage, with a 56% shortfall projected for 2015 and an alarming 63% projected for 2020 (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2002). The wide variability in these projections likely results from variations in general population demographics and density, the number and size of health care services that employ RNs, the locations and capacity of nursing education programs to graduate the needed numbers of nurses, and the demographics of each state’s nursing workforce.

EXCERPT

By all counts, the nursing workforce shortage is growing and will reach critical proportions beginning in 2010, and will continue to worsen at least through 2020 (National Center for Health Workforce Analysis, 2000). In addition, by 2010, the workforce shortage will be the largest ever in American history for the nursing profession. Only in Hawaii, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, and New Hampshire is the supply of RNs projected to meet the demand in 2020. All other states will experience significant shortfalls. Wyoming is predicted to experience the worst shortage, with a 56% shortfall projected for 2015 and an alarming 63% projected for 2020 (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2002). The wide variability in these projections likely results from variations in general population demographics and density, the number and size of health care services that employ RNs, the locations and capacity of nursing education programs to graduate the needed numbers of nurses, and the demographics of each state’s nursing workforce.

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