Journal of Nursing Education

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Faculty Q&A 

Faculty Q&A

Abstract

Send in your questions for Faculty Q&A!

We want your questions not only about issues related to how to teach and instructional strategies, but also about other issues faced by faculty (both new and established). Here’s an example:

“I was shocked to have a student accuse me of sexism. The student is male and says there is an inherent bias against male students, as I have answered questions posed to me by female students when we were in the change room preparing for a clinical shift. How can I guard against this type of unintentional problem in the future?”

Here’s what you need to know:

  1. Questions need to be short and, preferably, include a specific scenario or examples.
  2. Submit questions that address practical issues faced by faculty and can be answered in a few paragraphs (see example above).
  3. Avoid broad questions that would require an entire article to answer.
  4. E-mail your questions, along with your full name and credentials, to Karen G. Stanwood, ELS, Executive Editor, at kstanwood@slackinc.com.

EXCERPT

I have a master’s degree in nursing but am having difficulty finding a teaching position. I’m an experienced clinician with an excellent work history, and I have preceptored students in the clinical setting, with good evaluations. I keep hearing that there is a big faculty shortage, and I live in an area where there are several associate and baccalaureate programs, but I’ve been told I don’t have enough teaching experience. How can I get that experience if no one will offer me a position? Could it be because I don’t have a doctoral degree?

I teach a health policy course that uses asynchronous online group discussions. Students are expected to cite their resources, including the course text and related materials, as a way to demonstrate integration of course concepts into their thinking. Groups are also encouraged to engage in lively but respectful debate on ideas, recognizing that we learn by understanding how others perceive issues.

Are there different strategies faculty should use when teaching online courses on topics such as ethics, pain management, and end of life?

Abstract

Send in your questions for Faculty Q&A!

We want your questions not only about issues related to how to teach and instructional strategies, but also about other issues faced by faculty (both new and established). Here’s an example:

“I was shocked to have a student accuse me of sexism. The student is male and says there is an inherent bias against male students, as I have answered questions posed to me by female students when we were in the change room preparing for a clinical shift. How can I guard against this type of unintentional problem in the future?”

Here’s what you need to know:

  1. Questions need to be short and, preferably, include a specific scenario or examples.
  2. Submit questions that address practical issues faced by faculty and can be answered in a few paragraphs (see example above).
  3. Avoid broad questions that would require an entire article to answer.
  4. E-mail your questions, along with your full name and credentials, to Karen G. Stanwood, ELS, Executive Editor, at kstanwood@slackinc.com.

EXCERPT

I have a master’s degree in nursing but am having difficulty finding a teaching position. I’m an experienced clinician with an excellent work history, and I have preceptored students in the clinical setting, with good evaluations. I keep hearing that there is a big faculty shortage, and I live in an area where there are several associate and baccalaureate programs, but I’ve been told I don’t have enough teaching experience. How can I get that experience if no one will offer me a position? Could it be because I don’t have a doctoral degree?

I teach a health policy course that uses asynchronous online group discussions. Students are expected to cite their resources, including the course text and related materials, as a way to demonstrate integration of course concepts into their thinking. Groups are also encouraged to engage in lively but respectful debate on ideas, recognizing that we learn by understanding how others perceive issues.

Are there different strategies faculty should use when teaching online courses on topics such as ethics, pain management, and end of life?

Send in your questions for Faculty Q&A!

We want your questions not only about issues related to how to teach and instructional strategies, but also about other issues faced by faculty (both new and established). Here’s an example:

“I was shocked to have a student accuse me of sexism. The student is male and says there is an inherent bias against male students, as I have answered questions posed to me by female students when we were in the change room preparing for a clinical shift. How can I guard against this type of unintentional problem in the future?”

Here’s what you need to know:

  1. Questions need to be short and, preferably, include a specific scenario or examples.
  2. Submit questions that address practical issues faced by faculty and can be answered in a few paragraphs (see example above).
  3. Avoid broad questions that would require an entire article to answer.
  4. E-mail your questions, along with your full name and credentials, to Karen G. Stanwood, ELS, Executive Editor, at kstanwood@slackinc.com.

EXCERPT

I have a master’s degree in nursing but am having difficulty finding a teaching position. I’m an experienced clinician with an excellent work history, and I have preceptored students in the clinical setting, with good evaluations. I keep hearing that there is a big faculty shortage, and I live in an area where there are several associate and baccalaureate programs, but I’ve been told I don’t have enough teaching experience. How can I get that experience if no one will offer me a position? Could it be because I don’t have a doctoral degree?

I teach a health policy course that uses asynchronous online group discussions. Students are expected to cite their resources, including the course text and related materials, as a way to demonstrate integration of course concepts into their thinking. Groups are also encouraged to engage in lively but respectful debate on ideas, recognizing that we learn by understanding how others perceive issues.

Are there different strategies faculty should use when teaching online courses on topics such as ethics, pain management, and end of life?

10.3928/01484834-20070101-02

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