Journal of Nursing Education

Major Articles 

The Effects of Student Incivility on Nursing Faculty

Susan Luparell, PhD, APRN, BC

Abstract

ABSTRACT

In this study, 21 nursing faculty who experienced uncivil encounters with nursing students were interviewed to determine what effects those encounters had on them. The uncivil encounters ranged from relatively mild to highly aggressive, including overt threats to the faculty members’ well-being. The effects of the uncivil encounters on the nursing faculty involved were significant and included both short-term and long-term sequelae, such as physical and emotional reactions, decreased self-esteem, loss of confidence in their teaching abilities, significant time expenditures, and negative effects on the educational process. Three faculty members left nursing education and cited their interactions with students as an influential factor.

AUTHOR

Received: July 10, 2004

Accepted: October 27, 2005

Dr. Luparell is Assistant Professor, Montana State University, College of Nursing, Great Falls Campus, Great Falls, Montana.

This manuscript was developed from a presentation delivered at the 37th annual Communicating Nursing Research Conference/18th annual Western Institute of Nursing Assembly, Portland, Oregon, April 2004.

Address correspondence to Susan Luparell, PhD, APRN, BC, Assistant Professor, Montana State University, College of Nursing, Great Falls Campus, 400 15th Avenue South, Suite 106, Great Falls, MT 59405; e-mail: luparell@montana.edu.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

In this study, 21 nursing faculty who experienced uncivil encounters with nursing students were interviewed to determine what effects those encounters had on them. The uncivil encounters ranged from relatively mild to highly aggressive, including overt threats to the faculty members’ well-being. The effects of the uncivil encounters on the nursing faculty involved were significant and included both short-term and long-term sequelae, such as physical and emotional reactions, decreased self-esteem, loss of confidence in their teaching abilities, significant time expenditures, and negative effects on the educational process. Three faculty members left nursing education and cited their interactions with students as an influential factor.

AUTHOR

Received: July 10, 2004

Accepted: October 27, 2005

Dr. Luparell is Assistant Professor, Montana State University, College of Nursing, Great Falls Campus, Great Falls, Montana.

This manuscript was developed from a presentation delivered at the 37th annual Communicating Nursing Research Conference/18th annual Western Institute of Nursing Assembly, Portland, Oregon, April 2004.

Address correspondence to Susan Luparell, PhD, APRN, BC, Assistant Professor, Montana State University, College of Nursing, Great Falls Campus, 400 15th Avenue South, Suite 106, Great Falls, MT 59405; e-mail: luparell@montana.edu.

ABSTRACT

In this study, 21 nursing faculty who experienced uncivil encounters with nursing students were interviewed to determine what effects those encounters had on them. The uncivil encounters ranged from relatively mild to highly aggressive, including overt threats to the faculty members’ well-being. The effects of the uncivil encounters on the nursing faculty involved were significant and included both short-term and long-term sequelae, such as physical and emotional reactions, decreased self-esteem, loss of confidence in their teaching abilities, significant time expenditures, and negative effects on the educational process. Three faculty members left nursing education and cited their interactions with students as an influential factor.

AUTHOR

Received: July 10, 2004

Accepted: October 27, 2005

Dr. Luparell is Assistant Professor, Montana State University, College of Nursing, Great Falls Campus, Great Falls, Montana.

This manuscript was developed from a presentation delivered at the 37th annual Communicating Nursing Research Conference/18th annual Western Institute of Nursing Assembly, Portland, Oregon, April 2004.

Address correspondence to Susan Luparell, PhD, APRN, BC, Assistant Professor, Montana State University, College of Nursing, Great Falls Campus, 400 15th Avenue South, Suite 106, Great Falls, MT 59405; e-mail: luparell@montana.edu.

10.3928/01484834-20070101-04

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