Journal of Nursing Education

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Research Briefs 

Nursing Students' and Faculty Members' Knowledge of, Experience with, and Attitudes Toward Complementary and Alternative Therapies

So Sun Kim, PhD, RN; Judith A. Erlen, PhD, RN, FAAN; Kwuy Bun Kim, PhD, RN; Sohyune R. Sok, PhD, RN

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2006;45(9)
  • Posted September 1, 2006

Abstract

ABSTRACT

This study was designed to describe and compare the knowledge, experience, and attitudes of nursing faculty and students (undergraduate and graduate) regarding complementary and alternative therapies (CAT). A cross-sectional survey (N = 153) of undergraduate (n = 41) and graduate (n = 57) students and faculty (n = 55) was conducted in one school of nursing. Most participants were White (87%) and female (78%). More than 70% of the students and faculty agreed that clinical care should integrate the use of CAT. More than 85% desired more education about CAT, especially in undergraduate nursing curricula. More than 65% agreed that the clinical nurse specialist or nurse practitioner role should include the use of CAT in their practice, and more than 50% agreed that they had some knowledge of CAT, but only approximately 30% had some experience with CAT. Faculty and students expressed positive attitudes toward integrating CAT into the undergraduate nursing curriculum and nursing practice. Faculty development and nursing research are needed to facilitate curriculum change and integrate CAT into nursing programs at all levels.

AUTHORS

Received: March 7, 2005

Accepted: June 17, 2005

Dr. So Sun Kim is Associate Professor, College of Nursing, Yonsei University, and Dr. Kwuy Bun Kim and Dr. Sok are Professors, College of Nursing Science, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, South Korea. Dr. Erlen is Doctoral Program Coordinator and Professor, School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Address correspondence to Sohyune R. Sok, PhD, RN, Professor, 412 College of Nursing Science, Kyung Hee University, #1 Hoegi-dong Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, South Korea 130-701; e-mail: 5977sok@khu.ac.kr.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

This study was designed to describe and compare the knowledge, experience, and attitudes of nursing faculty and students (undergraduate and graduate) regarding complementary and alternative therapies (CAT). A cross-sectional survey (N = 153) of undergraduate (n = 41) and graduate (n = 57) students and faculty (n = 55) was conducted in one school of nursing. Most participants were White (87%) and female (78%). More than 70% of the students and faculty agreed that clinical care should integrate the use of CAT. More than 85% desired more education about CAT, especially in undergraduate nursing curricula. More than 65% agreed that the clinical nurse specialist or nurse practitioner role should include the use of CAT in their practice, and more than 50% agreed that they had some knowledge of CAT, but only approximately 30% had some experience with CAT. Faculty and students expressed positive attitudes toward integrating CAT into the undergraduate nursing curriculum and nursing practice. Faculty development and nursing research are needed to facilitate curriculum change and integrate CAT into nursing programs at all levels.

AUTHORS

Received: March 7, 2005

Accepted: June 17, 2005

Dr. So Sun Kim is Associate Professor, College of Nursing, Yonsei University, and Dr. Kwuy Bun Kim and Dr. Sok are Professors, College of Nursing Science, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, South Korea. Dr. Erlen is Doctoral Program Coordinator and Professor, School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Address correspondence to Sohyune R. Sok, PhD, RN, Professor, 412 College of Nursing Science, Kyung Hee University, #1 Hoegi-dong Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, South Korea 130-701; e-mail: 5977sok@khu.ac.kr.

ABSTRACT

This study was designed to describe and compare the knowledge, experience, and attitudes of nursing faculty and students (undergraduate and graduate) regarding complementary and alternative therapies (CAT). A cross-sectional survey (N = 153) of undergraduate (n = 41) and graduate (n = 57) students and faculty (n = 55) was conducted in one school of nursing. Most participants were White (87%) and female (78%). More than 70% of the students and faculty agreed that clinical care should integrate the use of CAT. More than 85% desired more education about CAT, especially in undergraduate nursing curricula. More than 65% agreed that the clinical nurse specialist or nurse practitioner role should include the use of CAT in their practice, and more than 50% agreed that they had some knowledge of CAT, but only approximately 30% had some experience with CAT. Faculty and students expressed positive attitudes toward integrating CAT into the undergraduate nursing curriculum and nursing practice. Faculty development and nursing research are needed to facilitate curriculum change and integrate CAT into nursing programs at all levels.

AUTHORS

Received: March 7, 2005

Accepted: June 17, 2005

Dr. So Sun Kim is Associate Professor, College of Nursing, Yonsei University, and Dr. Kwuy Bun Kim and Dr. Sok are Professors, College of Nursing Science, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, South Korea. Dr. Erlen is Doctoral Program Coordinator and Professor, School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Address correspondence to Sohyune R. Sok, PhD, RN, Professor, 412 College of Nursing Science, Kyung Hee University, #1 Hoegi-dong Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul, South Korea 130-701; e-mail: 5977sok@khu.ac.kr.

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