Journal of Nursing Education

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Major Articles 

When Will Faculty Retire?: Factors Influencing Retirement Decisions of Nurse Educators

Susan D. Kowalski, PhD, RN; Karla Dalley, PhD, RN; and Tammy Weigand, MEd

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2006;45(9)
  • Posted September 1, 2006

Abstract

ABSTRACT

This cross-sectional study surveyed a random sample of 129 nurse educators teaching in 61 U.S. schools of nursing. After the educators indicated their desire to participate, the survey instrument was e-mailed to them for completion; a 37.6% response rate was obtained. Demographically, the typical respondent was a healthy, 52-year-old, Caucasian female with a PhD in nursing. Outcomes reflected that respondents’ mean anticipated age of retirement was 64.4; however, the optimal age of retirement desired by respondents was younger (62.4). The most influential factor affecting the timing of retirement was financial status. Workplace issues, personal and family health, and attitudes about retirement were other factors that affected participants’ retirement decisions. The study findings indicate that nurse educators, as a group, do not plan to work beyond age 65.

AUTHORS

Received: November 3, 2004

Accepted: April 1, 2005

Dr. Kowalski is Associate Professor of Nursing, Dr. Dalley is Assistant Professor of Nursing, and at the time this article was written, Ms. Weigand was a graduate assistant, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Nursing, Las Vegas, Nevada.

Address correspondence to Susan D. Kowalski, PhD, RN, Associate Professor of Nursing, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Nursing, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154-3018; e-mail: Susan.Kowalski@unlv.edu.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

This cross-sectional study surveyed a random sample of 129 nurse educators teaching in 61 U.S. schools of nursing. After the educators indicated their desire to participate, the survey instrument was e-mailed to them for completion; a 37.6% response rate was obtained. Demographically, the typical respondent was a healthy, 52-year-old, Caucasian female with a PhD in nursing. Outcomes reflected that respondents’ mean anticipated age of retirement was 64.4; however, the optimal age of retirement desired by respondents was younger (62.4). The most influential factor affecting the timing of retirement was financial status. Workplace issues, personal and family health, and attitudes about retirement were other factors that affected participants’ retirement decisions. The study findings indicate that nurse educators, as a group, do not plan to work beyond age 65.

AUTHORS

Received: November 3, 2004

Accepted: April 1, 2005

Dr. Kowalski is Associate Professor of Nursing, Dr. Dalley is Assistant Professor of Nursing, and at the time this article was written, Ms. Weigand was a graduate assistant, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Nursing, Las Vegas, Nevada.

Address correspondence to Susan D. Kowalski, PhD, RN, Associate Professor of Nursing, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Nursing, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154-3018; e-mail: Susan.Kowalski@unlv.edu.

ABSTRACT

This cross-sectional study surveyed a random sample of 129 nurse educators teaching in 61 U.S. schools of nursing. After the educators indicated their desire to participate, the survey instrument was e-mailed to them for completion; a 37.6% response rate was obtained. Demographically, the typical respondent was a healthy, 52-year-old, Caucasian female with a PhD in nursing. Outcomes reflected that respondents’ mean anticipated age of retirement was 64.4; however, the optimal age of retirement desired by respondents was younger (62.4). The most influential factor affecting the timing of retirement was financial status. Workplace issues, personal and family health, and attitudes about retirement were other factors that affected participants’ retirement decisions. The study findings indicate that nurse educators, as a group, do not plan to work beyond age 65.

AUTHORS

Received: November 3, 2004

Accepted: April 1, 2005

Dr. Kowalski is Associate Professor of Nursing, Dr. Dalley is Assistant Professor of Nursing, and at the time this article was written, Ms. Weigand was a graduate assistant, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Nursing, Las Vegas, Nevada.

Address correspondence to Susan D. Kowalski, PhD, RN, Associate Professor of Nursing, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Nursing, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154-3018; e-mail: Susan.Kowalski@unlv.edu.

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