Journal of Nursing Education

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Faculty Q&A 

Faculty Q&A

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2006;45(8)
  • Posted August 1, 2006

Abstract

Send in your questions for Faculty Q&A!

We want your questions not only about issues related to how to teach and instructional strategies, but also about other issues faced by faculty (both new and established). Here’s an example:

“I was shocked to have a student accuse me of sexism. The student is male and says there is an inherent bias against male students, as I have answered questions posed to me by female students when we were in the change room preparing for a clinical shift. How can I guard against this type of unintentional problem in the future?”

Here’s what you need to know:

  1. Questions need to be short and, preferably, include a specific scenario or examples.
  2. Submit questions that address practical issues faced by faculty and can be answered in a few paragraphs (see example above).
  3. Avoid broad questions that would require an entire article to answer.
  4. E-mail your questions, along with your full name and credentials, to Karen G. Stanwood, ELS, Executive Editor, at kstanwood@slackinc.com.

EXCERPT

There is some tension in my department toward nurse practitioner (NP) faculty who practice clinically. The rationale is that NP faculty must be certified and licensed as NPs for accreditation. However, some faculty who are not NPs take issue with the fact that NP faculty are allowed time to practice during the work week and make extra money. All full-time faculty are allowed 1 day of consultation per week; yet, it is primarily the NP faculty who avail themselves of this privilege. Other faculty say they are too busy teaching classes to practice and imply that NP faculty are given special privileges. Can you offer any suggestions on how to diffuse the tension?

If students fail a course, should they be permitted to take the course until they pass, or should they be dismissed from the program?

Someday I would like to be the dean in a school of nursing. What steps can I take now, early in my career, to prepare myself for this position?

How can senior faculty embrace new, young, energetic faculty members?

Abstract

Send in your questions for Faculty Q&A!

We want your questions not only about issues related to how to teach and instructional strategies, but also about other issues faced by faculty (both new and established). Here’s an example:

“I was shocked to have a student accuse me of sexism. The student is male and says there is an inherent bias against male students, as I have answered questions posed to me by female students when we were in the change room preparing for a clinical shift. How can I guard against this type of unintentional problem in the future?”

Here’s what you need to know:

  1. Questions need to be short and, preferably, include a specific scenario or examples.
  2. Submit questions that address practical issues faced by faculty and can be answered in a few paragraphs (see example above).
  3. Avoid broad questions that would require an entire article to answer.
  4. E-mail your questions, along with your full name and credentials, to Karen G. Stanwood, ELS, Executive Editor, at kstanwood@slackinc.com.

EXCERPT

There is some tension in my department toward nurse practitioner (NP) faculty who practice clinically. The rationale is that NP faculty must be certified and licensed as NPs for accreditation. However, some faculty who are not NPs take issue with the fact that NP faculty are allowed time to practice during the work week and make extra money. All full-time faculty are allowed 1 day of consultation per week; yet, it is primarily the NP faculty who avail themselves of this privilege. Other faculty say they are too busy teaching classes to practice and imply that NP faculty are given special privileges. Can you offer any suggestions on how to diffuse the tension?

If students fail a course, should they be permitted to take the course until they pass, or should they be dismissed from the program?

Someday I would like to be the dean in a school of nursing. What steps can I take now, early in my career, to prepare myself for this position?

How can senior faculty embrace new, young, energetic faculty members?

Send in your questions for Faculty Q&A!

We want your questions not only about issues related to how to teach and instructional strategies, but also about other issues faced by faculty (both new and established). Here’s an example:

“I was shocked to have a student accuse me of sexism. The student is male and says there is an inherent bias against male students, as I have answered questions posed to me by female students when we were in the change room preparing for a clinical shift. How can I guard against this type of unintentional problem in the future?”

Here’s what you need to know:

  1. Questions need to be short and, preferably, include a specific scenario or examples.
  2. Submit questions that address practical issues faced by faculty and can be answered in a few paragraphs (see example above).
  3. Avoid broad questions that would require an entire article to answer.
  4. E-mail your questions, along with your full name and credentials, to Karen G. Stanwood, ELS, Executive Editor, at kstanwood@slackinc.com.

EXCERPT

There is some tension in my department toward nurse practitioner (NP) faculty who practice clinically. The rationale is that NP faculty must be certified and licensed as NPs for accreditation. However, some faculty who are not NPs take issue with the fact that NP faculty are allowed time to practice during the work week and make extra money. All full-time faculty are allowed 1 day of consultation per week; yet, it is primarily the NP faculty who avail themselves of this privilege. Other faculty say they are too busy teaching classes to practice and imply that NP faculty are given special privileges. Can you offer any suggestions on how to diffuse the tension?

If students fail a course, should they be permitted to take the course until they pass, or should they be dismissed from the program?

Someday I would like to be the dean in a school of nursing. What steps can I take now, early in my career, to prepare myself for this position?

How can senior faculty embrace new, young, energetic faculty members?

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