Journal of Nursing Education

Major Articles 

Exploring the Challenges for Nontraditional Male Students Transitioning into a Nursing Program

Joshua S. Smith, PhD

Abstract

ABSTRACT

The nursing profession aims to increase the number of male nursing students and practicing nurses. Although a laudable goal, research on the factors associated with retaining male nursing students is lacking. In addition, research has failed to incorporate the challenges facing nontraditional male students, who represent a significant proportion of men enrolled in nursing programs. This study used a mixed method design to explore challenges experienced by nontraditional male students in a nursing program at a 2-year private college in the northeastern United States. Students cited difficulty balancing school, family, and work as among their greatest concerns. They also described their experiences as a numerical minority and how their life experiences and maturity helped them cope with the challenges they faced.

AUTHOR

Received: May 24, 2005

Accepted: December 6, 2005

Dr. Smith is Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology and Associate Director, Center for Urban and Multicultural Education, School of Education, Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis, Indianapolis, Indiana.

The author would like to thank the reviewers and Rachel Waltz for their insightful comments on earlier versions of the manuscript. A version of this article was presented at the 2005 American Educational Research Association conference.

Address correspondence to Joshua S. Smith, PhD, Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology and Associate Director, Center for Urban and Multicultural Education, School of Education, Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis, 902 West New York Street, ES 3151, Indianapolis, IN 46202; e-mail: jss2@iupui.edu.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

The nursing profession aims to increase the number of male nursing students and practicing nurses. Although a laudable goal, research on the factors associated with retaining male nursing students is lacking. In addition, research has failed to incorporate the challenges facing nontraditional male students, who represent a significant proportion of men enrolled in nursing programs. This study used a mixed method design to explore challenges experienced by nontraditional male students in a nursing program at a 2-year private college in the northeastern United States. Students cited difficulty balancing school, family, and work as among their greatest concerns. They also described their experiences as a numerical minority and how their life experiences and maturity helped them cope with the challenges they faced.

AUTHOR

Received: May 24, 2005

Accepted: December 6, 2005

Dr. Smith is Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology and Associate Director, Center for Urban and Multicultural Education, School of Education, Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis, Indianapolis, Indiana.

The author would like to thank the reviewers and Rachel Waltz for their insightful comments on earlier versions of the manuscript. A version of this article was presented at the 2005 American Educational Research Association conference.

Address correspondence to Joshua S. Smith, PhD, Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology and Associate Director, Center for Urban and Multicultural Education, School of Education, Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis, 902 West New York Street, ES 3151, Indianapolis, IN 46202; e-mail: jss2@iupui.edu.

ABSTRACT

The nursing profession aims to increase the number of male nursing students and practicing nurses. Although a laudable goal, research on the factors associated with retaining male nursing students is lacking. In addition, research has failed to incorporate the challenges facing nontraditional male students, who represent a significant proportion of men enrolled in nursing programs. This study used a mixed method design to explore challenges experienced by nontraditional male students in a nursing program at a 2-year private college in the northeastern United States. Students cited difficulty balancing school, family, and work as among their greatest concerns. They also described their experiences as a numerical minority and how their life experiences and maturity helped them cope with the challenges they faced.

AUTHOR

Received: May 24, 2005

Accepted: December 6, 2005

Dr. Smith is Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology and Associate Director, Center for Urban and Multicultural Education, School of Education, Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis, Indianapolis, Indiana.

The author would like to thank the reviewers and Rachel Waltz for their insightful comments on earlier versions of the manuscript. A version of this article was presented at the 2005 American Educational Research Association conference.

Address correspondence to Joshua S. Smith, PhD, Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology and Associate Director, Center for Urban and Multicultural Education, School of Education, Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis, 902 West New York Street, ES 3151, Indianapolis, IN 46202; e-mail: jss2@iupui.edu.

10.3928/01484834-20060701-05

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