Journal of Nursing Education

Educational Innovations 

The Multicultural Research Process

Bronwynne C. Evans, PhD, RN, CNS

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Qualitative research allows students to explore the complex experiences of health and illness and examine assumptions related to class, race, gender, and ethnicity. Faculty who teach qualitative research can promote culturally congruent nursing practice, and students can learn how such practice is grounded in research. The experiential approach taken in this class acquainted students with basic principles of qualitative research, used such principles to foster recognition of assumptions and increase cultural awareness, and encouraged a new way of knowing and being in nursing. The learning goals were to experience the “flavor” of qualitative data analysis using a filmed interview of an American Indian nurse and written interviews of a Hispanic/Latina nurse and nursing student, speaking about their educational experiences in nursing. In this process, the nurse educator exemplified principles of multicultural education for these budding teachers, such as weaving cultural content across the curriculum and role modeling concern for cultural issues in teaching, research, and service.

AUTHOR

Received: April 7, 2004

Accepted: April 1, 2005

Dr. Evans is Associate Professor, Arizona State University College of Nursing, Tempe, Arizona.

The author acknowledges the invaluable contributions of the interview participants and the cultural consultation supplied by Dr. Noel Chrisman. The data described in this publication were collected during implementation of a Nursing Diversity Grant number 6D19HP4036301 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Health Professions, Division of Nursing. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Division of Nursing.

Address correspondence to Bronwynne C. Evans, PhD, RN, CNS, Associate Professor, Arizona State University College of Nursing, PO Box 872602, Tempe, AZ 85287-2602; e-mail: bronwynne.evans@asu.edu.

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Qualitative research allows students to explore the complex experiences of health and illness and examine assumptions related to class, race, gender, and ethnicity. Faculty who teach qualitative research can promote culturally congruent nursing practice, and students can learn how such practice is grounded in research. The experiential approach taken in this class acquainted students with basic principles of qualitative research, used such principles to foster recognition of assumptions and increase cultural awareness, and encouraged a new way of knowing and being in nursing. The learning goals were to experience the “flavor” of qualitative data analysis using a filmed interview of an American Indian nurse and written interviews of a Hispanic/Latina nurse and nursing student, speaking about their educational experiences in nursing. In this process, the nurse educator exemplified principles of multicultural education for these budding teachers, such as weaving cultural content across the curriculum and role modeling concern for cultural issues in teaching, research, and service.

AUTHOR

Received: April 7, 2004

Accepted: April 1, 2005

Dr. Evans is Associate Professor, Arizona State University College of Nursing, Tempe, Arizona.

The author acknowledges the invaluable contributions of the interview participants and the cultural consultation supplied by Dr. Noel Chrisman. The data described in this publication were collected during implementation of a Nursing Diversity Grant number 6D19HP4036301 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Health Professions, Division of Nursing. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Division of Nursing.

Address correspondence to Bronwynne C. Evans, PhD, RN, CNS, Associate Professor, Arizona State University College of Nursing, PO Box 872602, Tempe, AZ 85287-2602; e-mail: bronwynne.evans@asu.edu.

ABSTRACT

Qualitative research allows students to explore the complex experiences of health and illness and examine assumptions related to class, race, gender, and ethnicity. Faculty who teach qualitative research can promote culturally congruent nursing practice, and students can learn how such practice is grounded in research. The experiential approach taken in this class acquainted students with basic principles of qualitative research, used such principles to foster recognition of assumptions and increase cultural awareness, and encouraged a new way of knowing and being in nursing. The learning goals were to experience the “flavor” of qualitative data analysis using a filmed interview of an American Indian nurse and written interviews of a Hispanic/Latina nurse and nursing student, speaking about their educational experiences in nursing. In this process, the nurse educator exemplified principles of multicultural education for these budding teachers, such as weaving cultural content across the curriculum and role modeling concern for cultural issues in teaching, research, and service.

AUTHOR

Received: April 7, 2004

Accepted: April 1, 2005

Dr. Evans is Associate Professor, Arizona State University College of Nursing, Tempe, Arizona.

The author acknowledges the invaluable contributions of the interview participants and the cultural consultation supplied by Dr. Noel Chrisman. The data described in this publication were collected during implementation of a Nursing Diversity Grant number 6D19HP4036301 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Health Professions, Division of Nursing. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Division of Nursing.

Address correspondence to Bronwynne C. Evans, PhD, RN, CNS, Associate Professor, Arizona State University College of Nursing, PO Box 872602, Tempe, AZ 85287-2602; e-mail: bronwynne.evans@asu.edu.

10.3928/01484834-20060701-07

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