Journal of Nursing Education

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Educational Innovations 

Use of a Breathalyzer in a Local Bar: A Community Education Project

Cindy Sullivan Kerber, PhD, APN, CS; Emily Schlenker, PsyD, RN, CHN

Abstract

In completing a faculty-assigned service-learning project, a group of nursing students sought to educate their peers and the public about the effects of alcohol consumption. Breathalyzer readings were obtained from 150 bar patrons and correlated with the number of drinks consumed and number of hours spent drinking. The results were used to educate bar patrons about the difference between how intoxicated they felt and their actual blood alcohol levels. The students also distributed information about substance abuse assistance and safe transportation home. This screening technique served as an application of secondary prevention principles for the nursing students. The project was considered innovative in that no similar study was found in the literature. Selected Healthy People 2010 goals were also addressed in this project.

AUTHORS

Received: May 19, 2004

Accepted: January 27, 2005

Dr. Kerber is Assistant Professor, Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, and Dr. Schlenker is Assistant Professor of Nursing, Mennonite College of Nursing, Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois.

Address correspondence to Cindy Sullivan Kerber, PhD, APN, CS, Assistant Professor, Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, IL 61701; e-mail: ckerber@iwu.edu.

Abstract

In completing a faculty-assigned service-learning project, a group of nursing students sought to educate their peers and the public about the effects of alcohol consumption. Breathalyzer readings were obtained from 150 bar patrons and correlated with the number of drinks consumed and number of hours spent drinking. The results were used to educate bar patrons about the difference between how intoxicated they felt and their actual blood alcohol levels. The students also distributed information about substance abuse assistance and safe transportation home. This screening technique served as an application of secondary prevention principles for the nursing students. The project was considered innovative in that no similar study was found in the literature. Selected Healthy People 2010 goals were also addressed in this project.

AUTHORS

Received: May 19, 2004

Accepted: January 27, 2005

Dr. Kerber is Assistant Professor, Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, and Dr. Schlenker is Assistant Professor of Nursing, Mennonite College of Nursing, Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois.

Address correspondence to Cindy Sullivan Kerber, PhD, APN, CS, Assistant Professor, Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, IL 61701; e-mail: ckerber@iwu.edu.

ABSTRACT

In completing a faculty-assigned service-learning project, a group of nursing students sought to educate their peers and the public about the effects of alcohol consumption. Breathalyzer readings were obtained from 150 bar patrons and correlated with the number of drinks consumed and number of hours spent drinking. The results were used to educate bar patrons about the difference between how intoxicated they felt and their actual blood alcohol levels. The students also distributed information about substance abuse assistance and safe transportation home. This screening technique served as an application of secondary prevention principles for the nursing students. The project was considered innovative in that no similar study was found in the literature. Selected Healthy People 2010 goals were also addressed in this project.

AUTHORS

Received: May 19, 2004

Accepted: January 27, 2005

Dr. Kerber is Assistant Professor, Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, and Dr. Schlenker is Assistant Professor of Nursing, Mennonite College of Nursing, Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois.

Address correspondence to Cindy Sullivan Kerber, PhD, APN, CS, Assistant Professor, Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, IL 61701; e-mail: ckerber@iwu.edu.

10.3928/01484834-20061101-05

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