Journal of Nursing Education

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Major Articles 

Reflection in the Disability Education of Undergraduate Nurses: An Effective Learning Tool?

Michelle Honey, MPhil, RGON; Susan Waterworth, MPhil, MSc, RGN; Heather Baker, MA(Hons.), RGON, RM; Katrina Lenzie-Smith, MA, RMN

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2006;45(11)
  • Posted November 1, 2006

Abstract

Reflection was integrated into an undergraduate nursing curriculum, with different frameworks demonstrating the application of a structured approach to reflection. Reflection is defined as examination and exploration of an issue of concern to help create or clarify meaning. The aim of this qualitative study was to evaluate the usefulness of formal reflection in the context of undergraduate nursing education during the disability module. Twelve reflection assignments written by second-year nursing students were analyzed. The analysis indicated that students’ reflection focused less on their experience of working with people with disabilities and more on their overall learning experience and coping with clinical practice. A central theme, Coping with Clinical Practice, and four subthemes were identified. Students acknowledged reflection as beneficial to their learning and linked to their clinical practice.

AUTHORS

Received: April 3, 2005

Accepted: August 29, 2005

Ms. Honey, Ms. Waterworth, Ms. Baker, and Ms. Lenzie-Smith are Senior Lecturers, School of Nursing, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Address correspondence to Michelle Honey, MPhil, RGON, Senior Lecturer, School of Nursing, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand; e-mail: m.honey@auckland.ac.nz.

Abstract

Reflection was integrated into an undergraduate nursing curriculum, with different frameworks demonstrating the application of a structured approach to reflection. Reflection is defined as examination and exploration of an issue of concern to help create or clarify meaning. The aim of this qualitative study was to evaluate the usefulness of formal reflection in the context of undergraduate nursing education during the disability module. Twelve reflection assignments written by second-year nursing students were analyzed. The analysis indicated that students’ reflection focused less on their experience of working with people with disabilities and more on their overall learning experience and coping with clinical practice. A central theme, Coping with Clinical Practice, and four subthemes were identified. Students acknowledged reflection as beneficial to their learning and linked to their clinical practice.

AUTHORS

Received: April 3, 2005

Accepted: August 29, 2005

Ms. Honey, Ms. Waterworth, Ms. Baker, and Ms. Lenzie-Smith are Senior Lecturers, School of Nursing, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Address correspondence to Michelle Honey, MPhil, RGON, Senior Lecturer, School of Nursing, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand; e-mail: m.honey@auckland.ac.nz.

ABSTRACT

Reflection was integrated into an undergraduate nursing curriculum, with different frameworks demonstrating the application of a structured approach to reflection. Reflection is defined as examination and exploration of an issue of concern to help create or clarify meaning. The aim of this qualitative study was to evaluate the usefulness of formal reflection in the context of undergraduate nursing education during the disability module. Twelve reflection assignments written by second-year nursing students were analyzed. The analysis indicated that students’ reflection focused less on their experience of working with people with disabilities and more on their overall learning experience and coping with clinical practice. A central theme, Coping with Clinical Practice, and four subthemes were identified. Students acknowledged reflection as beneficial to their learning and linked to their clinical practice.

AUTHORS

Received: April 3, 2005

Accepted: August 29, 2005

Ms. Honey, Ms. Waterworth, Ms. Baker, and Ms. Lenzie-Smith are Senior Lecturers, School of Nursing, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Address correspondence to Michelle Honey, MPhil, RGON, Senior Lecturer, School of Nursing, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand; e-mail: m.honey@auckland.ac.nz.

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