Journal of Nursing Education

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Research Briefs 

Using Audience Response Technology for Pretest Reviews in an Undergraduate Nursing Course

Pamela S. Stein, DMD; Sandra D. Challman, MSLS; Jennifer K. Brueckner, PhD

  • Journal of Nursing Education. 2006;45(11)
  • Posted November 1, 2006

Abstract

Implementing strategies to promote classroom interaction has been shown to enhance learning. In this study, we used an audience response system (ARS), an emerging technology, to actively engage students in examination reviews in an undergraduate nursing anatomy and physiology course. The reviews, set up as a pretest of 25 questions in a format similar to that of the game Jeopardy!®, were used before six of the eight examinations. Average scores of the class on examinations preceded by the interactive ARS review were compared with those on examinations preceded by the more traditional, lecture-style review; no significant improvement due to ARS use was found. However, results from a student satisfaction survey about ARS use demonstrated positive attitudes and perceived benefit from this interactive technology.

AUTHORS

Received: June 23, 2005

Accepted: August 31, 2005

Dr. Stein is Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Ms. Challman is Manager of Instructional Technology, University of Kentucky College of Dentistry, and Dr. Brueckner is Associate Professor, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Chandler Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky.

Address correspondence to Pamela S. Stein, DMD, Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Chandler Medical Center, Room MN 210, Lexington, KY 40536-0298; e-mail: pam.stein@uky.edu.

Abstract

Implementing strategies to promote classroom interaction has been shown to enhance learning. In this study, we used an audience response system (ARS), an emerging technology, to actively engage students in examination reviews in an undergraduate nursing anatomy and physiology course. The reviews, set up as a pretest of 25 questions in a format similar to that of the game Jeopardy!®, were used before six of the eight examinations. Average scores of the class on examinations preceded by the interactive ARS review were compared with those on examinations preceded by the more traditional, lecture-style review; no significant improvement due to ARS use was found. However, results from a student satisfaction survey about ARS use demonstrated positive attitudes and perceived benefit from this interactive technology.

AUTHORS

Received: June 23, 2005

Accepted: August 31, 2005

Dr. Stein is Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Ms. Challman is Manager of Instructional Technology, University of Kentucky College of Dentistry, and Dr. Brueckner is Associate Professor, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Chandler Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky.

Address correspondence to Pamela S. Stein, DMD, Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Chandler Medical Center, Room MN 210, Lexington, KY 40536-0298; e-mail: pam.stein@uky.edu.

ABSTRACT

Implementing strategies to promote classroom interaction has been shown to enhance learning. In this study, we used an audience response system (ARS), an emerging technology, to actively engage students in examination reviews in an undergraduate nursing anatomy and physiology course. The reviews, set up as a pretest of 25 questions in a format similar to that of the game Jeopardy!®, were used before six of the eight examinations. Average scores of the class on examinations preceded by the interactive ARS review were compared with those on examinations preceded by the more traditional, lecture-style review; no significant improvement due to ARS use was found. However, results from a student satisfaction survey about ARS use demonstrated positive attitudes and perceived benefit from this interactive technology.

AUTHORS

Received: June 23, 2005

Accepted: August 31, 2005

Dr. Stein is Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Ms. Challman is Manager of Instructional Technology, University of Kentucky College of Dentistry, and Dr. Brueckner is Associate Professor, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Chandler Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky.

Address correspondence to Pamela S. Stein, DMD, Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Chandler Medical Center, Room MN 210, Lexington, KY 40536-0298; e-mail: pam.stein@uky.edu.

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