Journal of Gerontological Nursing

Product News 

Product News

Abstract

The M.A.P. (Monitor, Alert and Protect) System, developed by Wellsense USA as a tool that assists caregivers in preventing pressure ulcers, is groundbreaking technology that takes the guesswork out of repositioning nonambulatory hospital patients and nursing home residents.

By positioning a “smart” M.A.P. coverlet with built-in pressure sensors over a patient or resident sleep surface, areas of pressure are identified, and a color-coded, live image is produced on a bedside monitor. The system also monitors the buildup of pressure over time at preset intervals and alerts caregivers when a periodic repositioning is due. The real-time M.A.P. and instant feedback mechanisms are invaluable tools for guiding caregivers through the process of off-loading potentially harmful high pressure points. Early testing at an 800+ bed hospital and a 200+ bed long-term care facility shows the M.A.P. System can provide numerous benefits allowing caregivers to manage their pressure ulcers program more effectively. Clinicians surveyed at the end of the testing period believed that the M.A.P. System improved their:

Case studies are being completed and will be released later this year. The cases include patients with deep tissue injuries who were considered at high risk for skin breakdown. The cases will cite instances where the M.A.P. System, along with caregivers’ normal repositioning regimen, may have helped avoid pressure ulcers from forming on some patients. For more information, visit http://www.themapsystem.com.

Source. “Wellsense Unveils First-Ever Bedside Patient Pressure Mapping System Designed to Assist Caregivers in Effectively Repositioning Patients.” (2011, May 4). Retrieved June 24, 2011 from http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/224117.php.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Tradjenta (linagliptin) tablets, used with diet and exercise, to improve blood glucose control in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Tradjenta increases the level of hormones that stimulate the release of insulin after a meal by blocking the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 or DPP-4, which leads to better blood glucose control. It can be taken alone or with existing treatment regimens.

Tradjenta was demonstrated to be safe and effective in eight double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical studies involving nearly 3,800 patients with type 2 diabetes. The studies showed improvement in blood glucose control compared with placebo.

Tradjenta has been studied as a stand-alone therapy and in combination with other type 2 diabetes therapies including metformin (Fortamet ®), glimepiride (Amaryl ®), and pioglitazone (Actos ®). Tradjenta has not been studied in combination with insulin and should not be used to treat people with type 1 diabetes or in those who have increased ketones in their blood or urine.

Source. “FDA Approves Tradjenta.” (2011, May 2). Retrieved June 23, 2011, from http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm253501.htm.

New Technology Prevents Pressure Ulcers

The M.A.P. (Monitor, Alert and Protect) System, developed by Wellsense USA as a tool that assists caregivers in preventing pressure ulcers, is groundbreaking technology that takes the guesswork out of repositioning nonambulatory hospital patients and nursing home residents.

By positioning a “smart” M.A.P. coverlet with built-in pressure sensors over a patient or resident sleep surface, areas of pressure are identified, and a color-coded, live image is produced on a bedside monitor. The system also monitors the buildup of pressure over time at preset intervals and alerts caregivers when a periodic repositioning is due. The real-time M.A.P. and instant feedback mechanisms are invaluable tools for guiding caregivers through the process of off-loading potentially harmful high pressure points. Early testing at an 800+ bed hospital and a 200+ bed long-term care facility shows the M.A.P. System can provide numerous benefits allowing caregivers to manage their pressure ulcers program more effectively. Clinicians surveyed at the end of the testing period believed that the M.A.P. System improved their:

  • Repositioning skills.
  • Timing.
  • Detection skills.
  • Decisions regarding proper support surfaces.
  • Overall ability to help prevent pressure ulcer development.

Case studies are being completed and will be released later this year. The cases include patients with deep tissue injuries who were considered at high risk for skin breakdown. The cases will cite instances where the M.A.P. System, along with caregivers’ normal repositioning regimen, may have helped avoid pressure ulcers from forming on some patients. For more information, visit http://www.themapsystem.com.

Source. “Wellsense Unveils First-Ever Bedside Patient Pressure Mapping System Designed to Assist Caregivers in Effectively Repositioning Patients.” (2011, May 4). Retrieved June 24, 2011 from http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/224117.php.

FDA Approves New Diabetes Drug

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Tradjenta (linagliptin) tablets, used with diet and exercise, to improve blood glucose control in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Tradjenta increases the level of hormones that stimulate the release of insulin after a meal by blocking the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-4 or DPP-4, which leads to better blood glucose control. It can be taken alone or with existing treatment regimens.

Tradjenta was demonstrated to be safe and effective in eight double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical studies involving nearly 3,800 patients with type 2 diabetes. The studies showed improvement in blood glucose control compared with placebo.

Tradjenta has been studied as a stand-alone therapy and in combination with other type 2 diabetes therapies including metformin (Fortamet ®), glimepiride (Amaryl ®), and pioglitazone (Actos ®). Tradjenta has not been studied in combination with insulin and should not be used to treat people with type 1 diabetes or in those who have increased ketones in their blood or urine.

Source. “FDA Approves Tradjenta.” (2011, May 2). Retrieved June 23, 2011, from http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm253501.htm.

10.3928/00989134-20110705-99

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