Journal of Gerontological Nursing

Feature Article 

Initiating Person-Centered Care Practices in Long-Term Care Facilities

Lynda G. Crandall, GNP, RN; Diana L. White, PhD; Sherrie Schuldheis, PhD, RN; Karen Amann Talerico, PhD, RN, CNS

Abstract

Person-centered care is a key concept guiding efforts to improve long-term care. Elements of person-centered care include personhood, knowing the person, maximizing choice and autonomy, comfort, nurturing relationships, and a supportive physical and organizational environment. The Oregon Health & Science University Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence and the state agency that oversees health care for older adults worked in partnership with 9 long-term care facilities. Each developed and implemented person-centered care practices, including those focused on bathing, dining, or gardening. This article describes the processes used to develop and support these practices. Three exemplary facilities made significant practice changes, 4 made important but more moderate changes, and 2 made minimal progress. These facilities differed in terms of existing culture, management practices, staff involvement, and attention to sustainability.

Abstract

Person-centered care is a key concept guiding efforts to improve long-term care. Elements of person-centered care include personhood, knowing the person, maximizing choice and autonomy, comfort, nurturing relationships, and a supportive physical and organizational environment. The Oregon Health & Science University Hartford Center of Geriatric Nursing Excellence and the state agency that oversees health care for older adults worked in partnership with 9 long-term care facilities. Each developed and implemented person-centered care practices, including those focused on bathing, dining, or gardening. This article describes the processes used to develop and support these practices. Three exemplary facilities made significant practice changes, 4 made important but more moderate changes, and 2 made minimal progress. These facilities differed in terms of existing culture, management practices, staff involvement, and attention to sustainability.
Authors
Ms. Crandall is Chronic Care Coordinator, Oregon Seniors and People with Physical Disabilities, Salem, Dr. White is Assistant Professor, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Dr. Schuldheis is Director of Nursing Research, Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Portland, and Dr. Talerico is Consultant, Amann Talerico Consulting, Portland, Oregon.

Address correspondence to Diana L. White, PhD, Assistant Professor, Oregon Health & Science University, 3455 SW U.S. Veteran’s Road, SN-6S, Portland, OR 97239-2941; e-mail: whitedi@ohsu.edu.

10.3928/00989134-20071101-08

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