Journal of Gerontological Nursing

Guest Editorial Free

Partnerships in Gerontological Nursing Research and Practice

Theresa A. Harvath, PhD, RN, CNS

Abstract

EXCERPT

When I worked as a gerontological clinical nurse specialist in a long-term care facility in the late 1990s, I was charged with implementing our policy of restraint-free care. This change in practice was based on the increasing evidence that physical restraints did not protect nursing home residents from injury, which was the intended purpose, but instead actually caused serious injuries. In addition, there was mounting pressure from regulators to reduce the use of physical restraints.

Abstract

EXCERPT

When I worked as a gerontological clinical nurse specialist in a long-term care facility in the late 1990s, I was charged with implementing our policy of restraint-free care. This change in practice was based on the increasing evidence that physical restraints did not protect nursing home residents from injury, which was the intended purpose, but instead actually caused serious injuries. In addition, there was mounting pressure from regulators to reduce the use of physical restraints.

Authors
Theresa A. Harvath, PhD, RN, CNS is Associate Professor and Director, Advanced Practice Gerontological Nursing, Oregon Health & Science University School of Nursing, Portland, Oregon.

10.3928/00989134-20071101-01

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