Journal of Gerontological Nursing

CE Article 

Exercise Self-Efficacy in Older Women with Diastolic Heart Failure: Results of a Walking Program and Education Intervention

Rebecca Gary, PhD, RN

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate exercise self-efficacy in older women with stable New York Heart Association Functional Class II and III heart failure who were enrolled in a 12-week, home-based, low- to moderate-intensity combined walking and education program. Findings indicate that participation in a 12-week, home-based walking program improved self-efficacy for exercise adherence and workload physical function. Women in the program also improved in 6-minute walk distance, depressive symptoms, and quality of life at 12 weeks, while control participants had no change on any measures. These results support that an exercise intervention that progresses gradually has potential to improve exercise self-efficacy, physical function, depressive symptoms, and quality of life in women with heart failure compared to education alone.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate exercise self-efficacy in older women with stable New York Heart Association Functional Class II and III heart failure who were enrolled in a 12-week, home-based, low- to moderate-intensity combined walking and education program. Findings indicate that participation in a 12-week, home-based walking program improved self-efficacy for exercise adherence and workload physical function. Women in the program also improved in 6-minute walk distance, depressive symptoms, and quality of life at 12 weeks, while control participants had no change on any measures. These results support that an exercise intervention that progresses gradually has potential to improve exercise self-efficacy, physical function, depressive symptoms, and quality of life in women with heart failure compared to education alone.

Authors

Dr. Gary is Associate Faculty, Adult and Elder Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.

The author thanks Pat Clark, PhD, RN, FAHA for her assistance and ongoing support. Grants and support from the American Nurses Foundation Scholar 200106GCRC Grant RR00046.

Address correspondence to Rebecca Gary, PhD, RN, Associate Faculty, Adult and Elder Health, Emory University, 1520 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA, 30322.

10.3928/00989134-20060701-05

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