Vaccination

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LAIV ineffective for children during 2015-2016 season

September 22, 2017

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Although vaccination against influenza lessened the chances of illness, the live-attenuated vaccine demonstrated inefficacy and the inactivated vaccine demonstrated significant effectiveness in children for the 2015-2016 season, according to a study published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

“The effectiveness of influenza vaccination and the corresponding effect of vaccination programs on the burden of influenza can vary considerably from year to year,” Michael L. Jackson, PhD, from the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, and colleagues wrote. “In light of this variability, annual observational studies of influenza vaccine effectiveness are critical as ongoing evaluations of the value of influenza vaccination programs, as well as for identifying problems with licensed influenza vaccines.”

Editorial

Travel medicine and ID: Partners in an era of frequent global movement

Infectious Disease News, September 2017
Lin H. Chen, MD, FACP, FASTMH, FISTM; Mary Elizabeth Wilson, MD, FIDSA, FACP, FASTMH, FISTM
Travel history has a profound and essential role for the infectious disease clinician and for promoting public health priorities. The patient’s lifetime of…
Pharmacology Consult

Flu vaccine: The other ‘pneumonia shot’

Infectious Disease News, September 2017
Jeff Brock, PharmD, MBA, BCPS, AQ-ID
Being an infectious disease pharmacist and having children has its advantages. Children contract many different infectious syndromes, which allows me to take advantage…
In the JournalsPerspective

Early miscarriage potentially linked to influenza vaccination

September 14, 2017
Researchers discovered a potential link between miscarriage early in pregnancy and receipt of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09-containing vaccine in the preceding 28 days…
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