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VIDEO: Public’s reliance on Google costs physicians time with patients

BOSTON — While the internet has been a boon in making a vast wealth of information available, it has also made a vast amount of misinformation available, which is especially problematic when patients research their medical conditions online, then bring their findings to a health care provider.

“Most of our patients are going online and [they] have preconceived notions when they come to their office visit,” David R. Stukus, MD, associate professor of pediatrics within the division of allergy/immunology, and director of the complex asthma clinic at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, told Healio Internal Medicine. “It’s extremely important for allergists, and physicians in any specialty, to be aware of the information [their patients are] encountering when online, as well as the evidence behind the actual information that [the patients] need to hear.”

Stukus said the problem with a patient perusing Google and coming into an office visit with preconceived notions is that it costs a physician time and effort.

“When you’re cramped for time and trying to see 30 to 40 patients in a day, and you only have 10 or 15 minutes per office visit, [and] you have to devote half of that visit to undoing misconceptions, that’s a lot of work and time that can be spent on other issues related to their care.” – by Ryan McDonald

Reference:

Ellis A, Stukus D. S10. Competing with Dr. Google: How allergists can combat misinformation and misperceptions. Presented at: the ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting; Oct. 26-30, 2017; Boston, MA.

Disclosure: Stukus reports no relevant financial disclosures.

BOSTON — While the internet has been a boon in making a vast wealth of information available, it has also made a vast amount of misinformation available, which is especially problematic when patients research their medical conditions online, then bring their findings to a health care provider.

“Most of our patients are going online and [they] have preconceived notions when they come to their office visit,” David R. Stukus, MD, associate professor of pediatrics within the division of allergy/immunology, and director of the complex asthma clinic at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, told Healio Internal Medicine. “It’s extremely important for allergists, and physicians in any specialty, to be aware of the information [their patients are] encountering when online, as well as the evidence behind the actual information that [the patients] need to hear.”

Stukus said the problem with a patient perusing Google and coming into an office visit with preconceived notions is that it costs a physician time and effort.

“When you’re cramped for time and trying to see 30 to 40 patients in a day, and you only have 10 or 15 minutes per office visit, [and] you have to devote half of that visit to undoing misconceptions, that’s a lot of work and time that can be spent on other issues related to their care.” – by Ryan McDonald

Reference:

Ellis A, Stukus D. S10. Competing with Dr. Google: How allergists can combat misinformation and misperceptions. Presented at: the ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting; Oct. 26-30, 2017; Boston, MA.

Disclosure: Stukus reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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