Meeting News

Better fitness strong predictor for longevity

Seamus Whelton
Seamus Whelton

NEW ORLEANS — Regardless of CVD risk factor burden, increased physical fitness levels may result in better survival rates, especially in elderly individuals aged 70 years and older, according to data presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.

The study found that fitness was an extremely reliable risk predictor of survival among elderly individuals, with better accuracy than the number of traditional CV risk factors, Seamus Whelton, MD, MPH, assistant professor of medicine at the division of cardiology at Johns Hopkins Medicine, said in a press release.

“Assessing fitness is a low-cost, low-risk and low-technology tool that is underutilized in clinical practice for risk stratification,” he said.

Physicians should advise patients who are not exercising or are sedentary to start a low- to moderate-intensity exercise, according to Whelton.

Regardless of CVD risk factor burden, increased physical fitness levels may result in better survival rates, especially in elderly individuals aged 70 years and older.
Source: Adobe Stock

For more information on Whelton’s study, please click here. – by Alaina Tedesco

 

Reference:

Whelton S, et al. Abstract 1126-336. Presented at: American College of Cardiology Scientific Session; March 16-18, 2019; New Orleans.

Disclosure: Whelton reports no relevant financial disclosures.

 

Seamus Whelton
Seamus Whelton

NEW ORLEANS — Regardless of CVD risk factor burden, increased physical fitness levels may result in better survival rates, especially in elderly individuals aged 70 years and older, according to data presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.

The study found that fitness was an extremely reliable risk predictor of survival among elderly individuals, with better accuracy than the number of traditional CV risk factors, Seamus Whelton, MD, MPH, assistant professor of medicine at the division of cardiology at Johns Hopkins Medicine, said in a press release.

“Assessing fitness is a low-cost, low-risk and low-technology tool that is underutilized in clinical practice for risk stratification,” he said.

Physicians should advise patients who are not exercising or are sedentary to start a low- to moderate-intensity exercise, according to Whelton.

Regardless of CVD risk factor burden, increased physical fitness levels may result in better survival rates, especially in elderly individuals aged 70 years and older.
Source: Adobe Stock

For more information on Whelton’s study, please click here. – by Alaina Tedesco

 

Reference:

Whelton S, et al. Abstract 1126-336. Presented at: American College of Cardiology Scientific Session; March 16-18, 2019; New Orleans.

Disclosure: Whelton reports no relevant financial disclosures.