Top infectious disease stories: FDA grants dengue vaccine priority review, gut decontamination does not reduce bloodstream infections

The most-read story in infectious disease this week was the FDA granting priority review to a controversial dengue vaccine. The second most-read article was a trial that found that selective oral or digestive tract decontamination is not associated with reductions in ICU-acquired bloodstream infections.

Other popular stories included a large syphilis outbreak in Alaska, a study that argued that compensation policy changes are needed to attract more medical students and residents to the field of infectious diseases and data that suggested that injectable antiretroviral therapy regimen is durable over 160 weeks.

FDA grants Sanofi Pasteur’s dengue vaccine priority review

Sanofi Pasteur said its controversial dengue vaccine, known in other countries as Dengvaxia, has been granted priority review by the FDA. A decision on approval is expected by May 1, 2019. Read more.

Oral, gut decontamination does not reduce bloodstream infections in ICU

Results of a randomized clinical trial showed that selective oral or digestive tract decontamination is not associated with reductions in ICU-acquired bloodstream infections caused by multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria among patients receiving mechanical ventilation with moderate to high antibiotic resistance prevalence. Read more.

Alaska experiencing largest syphilis outbreak in at least 40 years

The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services announced that the state is experiencing its largest syphilis outbreak in at least 40 years. Read more.

Compensation for ID physicians ‘not a simple issue to fix’

Compensation policy changes are needed to attract more medical students and residents to the field of infectious diseases, where physicians are underpaid for the valuable role they play in protecting public health, experts argued. Read more.

LATTE-2: Injectable antiretroviral therapy regimen shows durable response over 160 weeks

A long-acting, two-drug, injectable antiretroviral therapy regimen of cabotegravir and rilpivirine administered every 4 or 8 weeks demonstrated high rates of virologic response, long-term durability of virologic response and good overall tolerability at 160 weeks, according to data from a phase 2b study presented by ViiV Healthcare. Read more.

The most-read story in infectious disease this week was the FDA granting priority review to a controversial dengue vaccine. The second most-read article was a trial that found that selective oral or digestive tract decontamination is not associated with reductions in ICU-acquired bloodstream infections.

Other popular stories included a large syphilis outbreak in Alaska, a study that argued that compensation policy changes are needed to attract more medical students and residents to the field of infectious diseases and data that suggested that injectable antiretroviral therapy regimen is durable over 160 weeks.

FDA grants Sanofi Pasteur’s dengue vaccine priority review

Sanofi Pasteur said its controversial dengue vaccine, known in other countries as Dengvaxia, has been granted priority review by the FDA. A decision on approval is expected by May 1, 2019. Read more.

Oral, gut decontamination does not reduce bloodstream infections in ICU

Results of a randomized clinical trial showed that selective oral or digestive tract decontamination is not associated with reductions in ICU-acquired bloodstream infections caused by multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria among patients receiving mechanical ventilation with moderate to high antibiotic resistance prevalence. Read more.

Alaska experiencing largest syphilis outbreak in at least 40 years

The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services announced that the state is experiencing its largest syphilis outbreak in at least 40 years. Read more.

Compensation for ID physicians ‘not a simple issue to fix’

Compensation policy changes are needed to attract more medical students and residents to the field of infectious diseases, where physicians are underpaid for the valuable role they play in protecting public health, experts argued. Read more.

LATTE-2: Injectable antiretroviral therapy regimen shows durable response over 160 weeks

A long-acting, two-drug, injectable antiretroviral therapy regimen of cabotegravir and rilpivirine administered every 4 or 8 weeks demonstrated high rates of virologic response, long-term durability of virologic response and good overall tolerability at 160 weeks, according to data from a phase 2b study presented by ViiV Healthcare. Read more.