In the Journals

Delayed cord clamping in preemies reduces risk of hemorrhage, intubation

Premature infants who remained attached to their umbilical cord for 45 seconds post-birth were significantly less likely to have brain bleeding, need blood transfusions or have respiratory distress, according to recently published data.

“We were impressed by the overall results, especially the significant reduction in intraventricular hemorrhage by almost 50 percent,” Arpitha Chiruvolu, MD, FAAP, Baylor University Medical Center, said in a press release. “There were no adverse effects, and significantly fewer babies who got delayed cord clamping were intubated in the delivery room.”

To assess the effects of delayed cord clamping (DCC) in infants born before or at 32 weeks gestation Chiruvolu and colleagues compared 60 infants who received DCC with 88 who received immediate cord clamping.

Results demonstrated that infants who received DCC were significantly less likely to be intubated in the delivery room, have respiratory distress syndrome or receive red blood cell transfusions within the first week of life, compared with infants who received immediate cord clamping.

Odds of intraventricular hemorrhage were significantly lower in infants who received DCC (18.3%) compared with infants who had immediate clamping (35.2%)

No association between delayed clamping and mortality rates were seen.

Chiruvolu and colleagues noted that more research is needed to determine the best time for cord clamping, and the long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes in premature infants associated with delayed clamping.

“When we were reviewing literature on delayed cord clamping, we found that it might be associated with good outcomes in preterm [infants], but a large number of hospitals do not have a consistent policy. Still, delayed cord clamping is not widely practiced due to the concern of delayed resuscitation in this vulnerable population,” Chiruvolu said in the release. – by Casey Hower

Disclosures: Healio.com/Family Medicine could not confirm relevant financial disclosures at the time of publication.

Premature infants who remained attached to their umbilical cord for 45 seconds post-birth were significantly less likely to have brain bleeding, need blood transfusions or have respiratory distress, according to recently published data.

“We were impressed by the overall results, especially the significant reduction in intraventricular hemorrhage by almost 50 percent,” Arpitha Chiruvolu, MD, FAAP, Baylor University Medical Center, said in a press release. “There were no adverse effects, and significantly fewer babies who got delayed cord clamping were intubated in the delivery room.”

To assess the effects of delayed cord clamping (DCC) in infants born before or at 32 weeks gestation Chiruvolu and colleagues compared 60 infants who received DCC with 88 who received immediate cord clamping.

Results demonstrated that infants who received DCC were significantly less likely to be intubated in the delivery room, have respiratory distress syndrome or receive red blood cell transfusions within the first week of life, compared with infants who received immediate cord clamping.

Odds of intraventricular hemorrhage were significantly lower in infants who received DCC (18.3%) compared with infants who had immediate clamping (35.2%)

No association between delayed clamping and mortality rates were seen.

Chiruvolu and colleagues noted that more research is needed to determine the best time for cord clamping, and the long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes in premature infants associated with delayed clamping.

“When we were reviewing literature on delayed cord clamping, we found that it might be associated with good outcomes in preterm [infants], but a large number of hospitals do not have a consistent policy. Still, delayed cord clamping is not widely practiced due to the concern of delayed resuscitation in this vulnerable population,” Chiruvolu said in the release. – by Casey Hower

Disclosures: Healio.com/Family Medicine could not confirm relevant financial disclosures at the time of publication.