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VIDEO: Diet low in short-chain carbs helps ease irritable bowel syndrome pain

NEWARK, Del. — Many foods can exacerbate symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, but several randomized clinical trials show benefit of a low FODMAP (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols) diet, Asyia Ahmad, MD, MPH, chief of gastroenterology at Drexel University College of Medicine, said at the second annual GI Symposium.

FODMAPs are short-chained carbohydrates that are poorly absorbed in the small intestines and can help reduce the production of short-chained fatty acid and butyric acid to optimize colonic health, according to Ahmad.

Clinicians should work with a trained dietician and be aware of food allergies that can complicate the patient’s situation, Ahmad told Healio Internal Medicine. – by Alaina Tedesco

Disclosure: Ahmad reports received fees from Medtronics for lecture material creation.

NEWARK, Del. — Many foods can exacerbate symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, but several randomized clinical trials show benefit of a low FODMAP (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols) diet, Asyia Ahmad, MD, MPH, chief of gastroenterology at Drexel University College of Medicine, said at the second annual GI Symposium.

FODMAPs are short-chained carbohydrates that are poorly absorbed in the small intestines and can help reduce the production of short-chained fatty acid and butyric acid to optimize colonic health, according to Ahmad.

Clinicians should work with a trained dietician and be aware of food allergies that can complicate the patient’s situation, Ahmad told Healio Internal Medicine. – by Alaina Tedesco

Disclosure: Ahmad reports received fees from Medtronics for lecture material creation.

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