Latest inflammatory bowel disease research from AIBD 2015

Researchers presented data and clinical progress on inflammatory bowel disease at the 2015 Advances in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation’s Clinical and Research Conference.

Live coverage from Orlando included news from the conference, onsite video interviews with leading experts and research implications on patient care and practice.

VIDEO: Expert forecasts 2016 hot topics in IBD

Miguel Regueiro , MD, AGAF, FACG, professor of medicine at University of Pittsburgh, discusses his AIBD presentation on what will be the hot clinical topics in IBD in 2016.

“The talk I gave on the hot topics really revolved around four subject areas,” Regueiro said. “One are biosimilars; [another] is when and if we can stop medications; the third is positioning our current biologic therapies in IBD; and then, finally, these concepts of new models of care in 2016 and beyond. I also touched a little bit upon our patient-centered medical home.” Watch here.

VIDEO: More data needed on de-escalation strategies in IBD

Jean- Frédéric Colombel , MD, director of the Susan and Leonard Feinstein IBD Clinical Center at Mount Sinai, New York City, discusses his presentation on de-escalation strategies for IBD therapies.

“We need much more data,” he said. “Stopping is risky business, with variable data, but — of course — some patients would like to stop, so you need to consider a lot of parameters. You need to consider demographics, age of the patients ... the severity of the disease ... level of remission ... and finally you need to consider the levels of the biologic in the blood.” Watch here.

Abnormal nutritional parameters common in pregnant women with IBD

Researchers found that multiple deficient nutritional parameters were common and inadequately assessed in pregnant women with IBD, according to a poster presentation.

“BMI may not be the optimal indicator of nutritional status in patients with IBD,” the researchers wrote. “Nutritional status and outcomes in pregnant women have not been fully investigated.” Read more.

VIDEO: IBD specialist recaps presentation on caring for elderly IBD patients

Tauseef Ali, MD, IBD specialist at St. Anthony hospital and director of the IBD clinical trials unit at University of Oklahoma, discussed a presentation delivered by Raymond Cross, MD, from University of Maryland, about caring for elderly patients with IBD.

“We know that by 2050, the aging population will double compared to what we had in 2012, so we will be taking care of a lot of elderly IBD patients,” Ali said. “Cross mentioned different unique aspects that come across when we are taking care of elderly patients. One is the fact that our ... elderly patients are on different medications for different disease states, so polypharmacy and how different drugs can potentially interact, increase, or decrease the efficacy or the side effects is one issue that we all need to be aware of.” Watch here.

CCFA introduces IBD Plexus at AIBD

The Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America introduced its newest research initiative known as IBD Plexus, a research knowledge and data exchange platform for Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

“Our goal is to build a research and information exchange platform that will accelerate research and transform the care of IBD patients by uniting clinicians, patients, academic scientists and our industry partners,” James Lewis, MD, MSCE, professor of medicine and epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, and chief scientist for IBD Plexus, said during a press conference. Read more.

Low immunity to HBV common in pediatric IBD patients

Pediatric patients with IBD who received a full series of hepatitis B virus infection vaccinations may develop lower immunity, according to a poster presentation.

“We hypothesized that serological hepatitis B virus titers may be low in the vaccinated pediatric IBD population, which might be due to a patient’s demographic/clinical factors or medications,” the researchers wrote. Read more.

Researchers presented data and clinical progress on inflammatory bowel disease at the 2015 Advances in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation’s Clinical and Research Conference.

Live coverage from Orlando included news from the conference, onsite video interviews with leading experts and research implications on patient care and practice.

VIDEO: Expert forecasts 2016 hot topics in IBD

Miguel Regueiro , MD, AGAF, FACG, professor of medicine at University of Pittsburgh, discusses his AIBD presentation on what will be the hot clinical topics in IBD in 2016.

“The talk I gave on the hot topics really revolved around four subject areas,” Regueiro said. “One are biosimilars; [another] is when and if we can stop medications; the third is positioning our current biologic therapies in IBD; and then, finally, these concepts of new models of care in 2016 and beyond. I also touched a little bit upon our patient-centered medical home.” Watch here.

VIDEO: More data needed on de-escalation strategies in IBD

Jean- Frédéric Colombel , MD, director of the Susan and Leonard Feinstein IBD Clinical Center at Mount Sinai, New York City, discusses his presentation on de-escalation strategies for IBD therapies.

“We need much more data,” he said. “Stopping is risky business, with variable data, but — of course — some patients would like to stop, so you need to consider a lot of parameters. You need to consider demographics, age of the patients ... the severity of the disease ... level of remission ... and finally you need to consider the levels of the biologic in the blood.” Watch here.

Abnormal nutritional parameters common in pregnant women with IBD

Researchers found that multiple deficient nutritional parameters were common and inadequately assessed in pregnant women with IBD, according to a poster presentation.

“BMI may not be the optimal indicator of nutritional status in patients with IBD,” the researchers wrote. “Nutritional status and outcomes in pregnant women have not been fully investigated.” Read more.

VIDEO: IBD specialist recaps presentation on caring for elderly IBD patients

Tauseef Ali, MD, IBD specialist at St. Anthony hospital and director of the IBD clinical trials unit at University of Oklahoma, discussed a presentation delivered by Raymond Cross, MD, from University of Maryland, about caring for elderly patients with IBD.

“We know that by 2050, the aging population will double compared to what we had in 2012, so we will be taking care of a lot of elderly IBD patients,” Ali said. “Cross mentioned different unique aspects that come across when we are taking care of elderly patients. One is the fact that our ... elderly patients are on different medications for different disease states, so polypharmacy and how different drugs can potentially interact, increase, or decrease the efficacy or the side effects is one issue that we all need to be aware of.” Watch here.

CCFA introduces IBD Plexus at AIBD

The Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America introduced its newest research initiative known as IBD Plexus, a research knowledge and data exchange platform for Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

“Our goal is to build a research and information exchange platform that will accelerate research and transform the care of IBD patients by uniting clinicians, patients, academic scientists and our industry partners,” James Lewis, MD, MSCE, professor of medicine and epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, and chief scientist for IBD Plexus, said during a press conference. Read more.

Low immunity to HBV common in pediatric IBD patients

Pediatric patients with IBD who received a full series of hepatitis B virus infection vaccinations may develop lower immunity, according to a poster presentation.

“We hypothesized that serological hepatitis B virus titers may be low in the vaccinated pediatric IBD population, which might be due to a patient’s demographic/clinical factors or medications,” the researchers wrote. Read more.