Meeting News

Dupixent reduces itch from atopic dermatitis

A 300-mg dose of Dupixent weekly or every 2 weeks significantly improved peak itch scores among patient with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis, according to research presented at the American Academy of Dermatology annual meeting.

“Moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis is characterized by inflammation of the skin resulting in a rash covering much of the body and persistent intense itch,” Jonathan I. Silverberg, MD, PhD, MPH, from the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University, told Healio Internal Medicine. “Itch is one of the most burdensome symptoms for patients and can be debilitating.”

Silverberg and colleagues pooled data from two phase 3 trials (SOLO 1 and 2) to evaluate whether Dupixent (dupilumab, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Sanofi) led to clinically meaningful improvements in pruritus in adults with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis (n = 1,379). Participants were randomly assigned to receive either 300 mg of dupilumab weekly (n = 462), 300 mg of dupilumab every 2 weeks (n = 457) or placebo weekly (n = 460).

Clinically meaningful improvements in pruritus were defined as achieving three- or four-point improvement in peak pruritus Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) scores from baseline to day 2 through 28.

The researchers found that at day 3, more patients receiving 300 mg of dupilumab weekly achieved daily peak pruritus NRS scores of three of more points than those receiving placebo (7.4% vs. 2.9%). Additionally, more patients receiving 300 mg of dupilumab every 2 weeks showed achieved daily peak pruritus NRS scores of three points or higher compared to those receiving placebo at day 4 (7.5% vs. 3.4%).

Compared with placebo, all patients receiving dupilumab demonstrated significant improvements in daily peak pruritus NRS scores throughout the study period. Approximately 39% of patients in each of the dupilumab groups achieved NRS scores of three or more points at day 28, compared with 14.3% of those in the placebo group.

Atopic dermatitis exacerbations, nasopharyngitis, injection-site reaction and conjunctivitis were the most commonly observed adverse events among all participants. Dupilumab was considered safe.

“Dupilumab began to improve patient-reported outcomes soon after treatment initiation,” Silverberg said.

“This new analysis shows that dupilumab began to reduce itch quickly in some patients and may have a significant impact on patients with uncontrolled moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis who experience persistent itching on a daily basis,” he added. – by Alaina Tedesco

Reference:

Silverberg JI, et al. “Dupilumab treatment induces rapid clinical improvement of itch in patients with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis.” Presented at: American Academy of Dermatology Annual Meeting. February 16-20, 2018; San Diego.

Disclosure: Silverberg reports being an investigator for Celgene, GlaxoSmithKline, Lilly, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc. and Roche; a consultant for AbbVie, Anacor, GlaxoSmithKline, Lilly, Medimmune, Pfizer, Proctor & Gamble and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc; and a speaker for Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc. Please see study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

A 300-mg dose of Dupixent weekly or every 2 weeks significantly improved peak itch scores among patient with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis, according to research presented at the American Academy of Dermatology annual meeting.

“Moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis is characterized by inflammation of the skin resulting in a rash covering much of the body and persistent intense itch,” Jonathan I. Silverberg, MD, PhD, MPH, from the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University, told Healio Internal Medicine. “Itch is one of the most burdensome symptoms for patients and can be debilitating.”

Silverberg and colleagues pooled data from two phase 3 trials (SOLO 1 and 2) to evaluate whether Dupixent (dupilumab, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Sanofi) led to clinically meaningful improvements in pruritus in adults with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis (n = 1,379). Participants were randomly assigned to receive either 300 mg of dupilumab weekly (n = 462), 300 mg of dupilumab every 2 weeks (n = 457) or placebo weekly (n = 460).

Clinically meaningful improvements in pruritus were defined as achieving three- or four-point improvement in peak pruritus Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) scores from baseline to day 2 through 28.

The researchers found that at day 3, more patients receiving 300 mg of dupilumab weekly achieved daily peak pruritus NRS scores of three of more points than those receiving placebo (7.4% vs. 2.9%). Additionally, more patients receiving 300 mg of dupilumab every 2 weeks showed achieved daily peak pruritus NRS scores of three points or higher compared to those receiving placebo at day 4 (7.5% vs. 3.4%).

Compared with placebo, all patients receiving dupilumab demonstrated significant improvements in daily peak pruritus NRS scores throughout the study period. Approximately 39% of patients in each of the dupilumab groups achieved NRS scores of three or more points at day 28, compared with 14.3% of those in the placebo group.

Atopic dermatitis exacerbations, nasopharyngitis, injection-site reaction and conjunctivitis were the most commonly observed adverse events among all participants. Dupilumab was considered safe.

“Dupilumab began to improve patient-reported outcomes soon after treatment initiation,” Silverberg said.

“This new analysis shows that dupilumab began to reduce itch quickly in some patients and may have a significant impact on patients with uncontrolled moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis who experience persistent itching on a daily basis,” he added. – by Alaina Tedesco

Reference:

Silverberg JI, et al. “Dupilumab treatment induces rapid clinical improvement of itch in patients with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis.” Presented at: American Academy of Dermatology Annual Meeting. February 16-20, 2018; San Diego.

Disclosure: Silverberg reports being an investigator for Celgene, GlaxoSmithKline, Lilly, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc. and Roche; a consultant for AbbVie, Anacor, GlaxoSmithKline, Lilly, Medimmune, Pfizer, Proctor & Gamble and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc; and a speaker for Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc. Please see study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

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