Top cardiology stories: New advances in preventive cardiology, FDA action on edible oils for CV health

The top story this week in cardiology was a Healio exclusive commentary on the new 2018 cholesterol guidelines.

In addition, the FDA announced that it will allow manufacturers of certain edible oils to make qualified health claims that their products have CV benefits.

Rounding out the most-read stories were research presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions, including data indicating that empagliflozin reduces left ventricular mass in type 2 diabetes, higher free thyroxine levels within normal range confer elevated atrial fibrillation risk and cardiac arrest-induced post-traumatic stress disorder increases risk for death and major CV events.

New advances in preventive cardiology: A critical appraisal of 2018 cholesterol guidelines

Rhanderson Cardoso, MD, Roger S. Blumenthal, MD, and Seth S. Martin, MD, MHS, offer commentary on the 2018 cholesterol guidelines. Read more.

FDA allows qualified health claims for CV benefits of certain edible oils

The FDA announced that it will allow manufacturers of edible oils containing at least 70% oleic acid to make qualified health claims that their products have CV benefits when replacing saturated fats. Read more.

EMPA-HEART: Empagliflozin reduces left ventricular mass in type 2 diabetes

CHICAGO — New data show that empagliflozin promotes reverse remodeling in patients with diabetes, which may explain the CV and HF benefits previously seen in the large EMPA-REG Outcome clinical trial. Read more.

Higher free thyroxine levels within normal range confer elevated atrial fibrillation risk

CHICAGO — Patients with elevated free thyroxine levels — still within what is considered the normal range — may be at greater risk for atrial fibrillation than those with lower levels, according to findings presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions. Read more.

Cardiac arrest-induced PTSD increases risk for death, major CV events

CHICAGO — Patients who exhibit signs of posttraumatic stress disorder after cardiac arrest are nearly three times as likely to die or experience a major adverse CV event within 1 year, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association Resuscitation Science Symposium. Read more.

The top story this week in cardiology was a Healio exclusive commentary on the new 2018 cholesterol guidelines.

In addition, the FDA announced that it will allow manufacturers of certain edible oils to make qualified health claims that their products have CV benefits.

Rounding out the most-read stories were research presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions, including data indicating that empagliflozin reduces left ventricular mass in type 2 diabetes, higher free thyroxine levels within normal range confer elevated atrial fibrillation risk and cardiac arrest-induced post-traumatic stress disorder increases risk for death and major CV events.

New advances in preventive cardiology: A critical appraisal of 2018 cholesterol guidelines

Rhanderson Cardoso, MD, Roger S. Blumenthal, MD, and Seth S. Martin, MD, MHS, offer commentary on the 2018 cholesterol guidelines. Read more.

FDA allows qualified health claims for CV benefits of certain edible oils

The FDA announced that it will allow manufacturers of edible oils containing at least 70% oleic acid to make qualified health claims that their products have CV benefits when replacing saturated fats. Read more.

EMPA-HEART: Empagliflozin reduces left ventricular mass in type 2 diabetes

CHICAGO — New data show that empagliflozin promotes reverse remodeling in patients with diabetes, which may explain the CV and HF benefits previously seen in the large EMPA-REG Outcome clinical trial. Read more.

Higher free thyroxine levels within normal range confer elevated atrial fibrillation risk

CHICAGO — Patients with elevated free thyroxine levels — still within what is considered the normal range — may be at greater risk for atrial fibrillation than those with lower levels, according to findings presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions. Read more.

Cardiac arrest-induced PTSD increases risk for death, major CV events

CHICAGO — Patients who exhibit signs of posttraumatic stress disorder after cardiac arrest are nearly three times as likely to die or experience a major adverse CV event within 1 year, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association Resuscitation Science Symposium. Read more.