ACIP recommends HAV catch-up vaccination for all kids

The CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, or ACIP, voted unanimously to recommend that children and adolescents aged 2 to 18 years be vaccinated against hepatitis A virus if they have not already received the vaccine, and that all patients at least 1 year old with HIV be vaccinated.

The ACIP has recommended since 2006 that all children be vaccinated against HAV between their first and second birthday. But until the new vote, it has said that older children be “considered” only for catch-up vaccination.

Routine HAV vaccination also is recommended in several at-risk groups, including men who have sex with men, people who use drugs, patients with chronic liver disease and people who are experiencing homelessness, a new indication added last year. Patients with HIV are now added to that group.

The votes came amid a multistate outbreak of HAV that is occurring mostly in drug users and people experiencing homelessness. HAV infections have increased almost 300% in recent years.

The ACIP also voted unanimously to recommend that patients aged 10 year or older with complement deficiency, complement inhibitor use, asplenia or who are microbiologists receive a meningococcal B booster dose 1 year following completion of a meningococcal B primary series, followed by booster doses every 2 to 3 years afterward for as long as the risk remains.

Earlier this week, the ACIP voted to change certain recommendations for HPV and pneumococcal vaccination, including recommending that patients aged up to 45 years speak with their doctors about receiving the HPV vaccine. In an unusually close vote, the committee voted against recommending the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for all adults aged 65 years or older, reversing a 2014 recommendation. – by Gerard Gallagher

The CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, or ACIP, voted unanimously to recommend that children and adolescents aged 2 to 18 years be vaccinated against hepatitis A virus if they have not already received the vaccine, and that all patients at least 1 year old with HIV be vaccinated.

The ACIP has recommended since 2006 that all children be vaccinated against HAV between their first and second birthday. But until the new vote, it has said that older children be “considered” only for catch-up vaccination.

Routine HAV vaccination also is recommended in several at-risk groups, including men who have sex with men, people who use drugs, patients with chronic liver disease and people who are experiencing homelessness, a new indication added last year. Patients with HIV are now added to that group.

The votes came amid a multistate outbreak of HAV that is occurring mostly in drug users and people experiencing homelessness. HAV infections have increased almost 300% in recent years.

The ACIP also voted unanimously to recommend that patients aged 10 year or older with complement deficiency, complement inhibitor use, asplenia or who are microbiologists receive a meningococcal B booster dose 1 year following completion of a meningococcal B primary series, followed by booster doses every 2 to 3 years afterward for as long as the risk remains.

Earlier this week, the ACIP voted to change certain recommendations for HPV and pneumococcal vaccination, including recommending that patients aged up to 45 years speak with their doctors about receiving the HPV vaccine. In an unusually close vote, the committee voted against recommending the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for all adults aged 65 years or older, reversing a 2014 recommendation. – by Gerard Gallagher

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