N. gonorrhoeae strain resistant to third-generation cephalosporins identified

Researchers in Spain have identified the first strain of Neisseria gonorrhoeae resistant to third-generation cephalosporins, according to a presentation.

Juan Jose Gonzalez-Lopez, PhD, of Hospital Vall d’Hebron in Barcelona, and colleagues conducted the study, in which they monitored the susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae. They analyzed the susceptibility to azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid, spectinomycin and doxycycline by disk-diffusion method according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) recommendations. They analyzed the susceptibility to penicillin, ceftriaxone and cefixime (Suprax, Lupin Pharmaceuticals) by E-test, according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) recommendations.

The study included 100 strains. Of these, 68 had decreased susceptibility to penicillin and 10.3% was due to production of penicillinase. The researchers detected one strain resistant to third-generation cephalosporins, including ceftriaxone and cefixime.

When using EUCAST criteria, 3% of the strains had decreased susceptibility to ceftriaxone and 10% had decreased susceptibility to cefixime. In addition, 53% of the strains were resistant to quinolones and 99% were resistant to doxycycline. Five strains were resistant to azithromycin and one was resistant to spectinomycin.

Molecular typing was done on 45 of the strains. This showed that 12 strains belonged to sequence type (ST)-1407, three to ST-2992, three to ST-1582, 10 to other STs and 17 strains had not been described previously. The one strain resistant to third-generation cephalosporins belonged to ST-1407, as did 69% of the strains with reduced susceptibility.

For more information:

Serra J. #L2-303.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Researchers in Spain have identified the first strain of Neisseria gonorrhoeae resistant to third-generation cephalosporins, according to a presentation.

Juan Jose Gonzalez-Lopez, PhD, of Hospital Vall d’Hebron in Barcelona, and colleagues conducted the study, in which they monitored the susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae. They analyzed the susceptibility to azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid, spectinomycin and doxycycline by disk-diffusion method according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) recommendations. They analyzed the susceptibility to penicillin, ceftriaxone and cefixime (Suprax, Lupin Pharmaceuticals) by E-test, according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) recommendations.

The study included 100 strains. Of these, 68 had decreased susceptibility to penicillin and 10.3% was due to production of penicillinase. The researchers detected one strain resistant to third-generation cephalosporins, including ceftriaxone and cefixime.

When using EUCAST criteria, 3% of the strains had decreased susceptibility to ceftriaxone and 10% had decreased susceptibility to cefixime. In addition, 53% of the strains were resistant to quinolones and 99% were resistant to doxycycline. Five strains were resistant to azithromycin and one was resistant to spectinomycin.

Molecular typing was done on 45 of the strains. This showed that 12 strains belonged to sequence type (ST)-1407, three to ST-2992, three to ST-1582, 10 to other STs and 17 strains had not been described previously. The one strain resistant to third-generation cephalosporins belonged to ST-1407, as did 69% of the strains with reduced susceptibility.

For more information:

Serra J. #L2-303.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.