Institution Notes

NIH funds TB research in Uganda

The NIH recently awarded an $861,000 grant to the Boston Medical Center to train Ugandans in basic research of tuberculosis and emerging diseases, according to a press release.

The 5-year grant will allow five postdoctoral faculty members from Makerere University in Uganda to earn their master’s degrees in pathology at Boston University School of Medicine. The faculty members will receive training in several research areas, including immunology, inflammation, pathogenesis, bioinformatics, antimicrobial resistance and emerging pathogens.

Boston Medical Center is one of five institutions to receive similar funding to enhance infectious disease research in low- and middle-income countries.

“Although donors have contributed substantial support for clinical research/training, we address an unmet need: training of future faculty in basic sciences research,” Jerrold Ellner, MD, principal investigator of the award and chief of infectious disease at Boston Medical Center, said in the release. “This program will advance [Makerere University] to a full self-sufficient partner and leader in diagnostics, treatments, vaccines and understanding the pathogenesis and correlates of protective immunity.”

The NIH recently awarded an $861,000 grant to the Boston Medical Center to train Ugandans in basic research of tuberculosis and emerging diseases, according to a press release.

The 5-year grant will allow five postdoctoral faculty members from Makerere University in Uganda to earn their master’s degrees in pathology at Boston University School of Medicine. The faculty members will receive training in several research areas, including immunology, inflammation, pathogenesis, bioinformatics, antimicrobial resistance and emerging pathogens.

Boston Medical Center is one of five institutions to receive similar funding to enhance infectious disease research in low- and middle-income countries.

“Although donors have contributed substantial support for clinical research/training, we address an unmet need: training of future faculty in basic sciences research,” Jerrold Ellner, MD, principal investigator of the award and chief of infectious disease at Boston Medical Center, said in the release. “This program will advance [Makerere University] to a full self-sufficient partner and leader in diagnostics, treatments, vaccines and understanding the pathogenesis and correlates of protective immunity.”