In the Journals

HAIs linked to resistant organisms mostly unchanged in 2 years

The proportion of health care-associated infections attributed to resistant organisms has not changed in 2 years, researchers with the CDC’s National Healthcare Safety Network reported.

For the study, the researchers compared National Healthcare Safety Network data on health care-associated infections (HAIs) from 2007-2008 to data from 2009-2010. The infections included central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs), catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and surgical site infections (SSIs). They determined the proportion of isolates resistant to antimicrobial agents.

From 2009-2010, there were 69,475 HAIs reported from 2,039 hospitals: 40% were CLABSIs, 27% were CAUTIs, 10% were VAP and 23% were SSIs. There were 81,139 pathogens identified, of which 82% came from one of eight pathogen groups: Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Coagulase-negative staphylococci, Candida spp., Klebsiella spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Enterobacter spp.

Although the proportion of resistant infections was similar between the two time periods, there was a slight decrease in the number of methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections. The following multidrug-resistant phenotypes comprised 20% of the HAIs: MRSA; vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus; extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant K. pneumoniae/oxytoca, E. coli and Enterobacter spp; and carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae/oxytoca, E. coli and Enterobacter spp.

“These data represent a current assessment of the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant phenotypes associated with HAIs in patients across approximately 2,000 hospitals in the United States,” the researchers wrote. “Several of the resistant phenotypes assessed are not limited to a small subset of hospitals, which should alert the infection control community to the need for vigilance in identification and implementation of appropriate infection control as they address these challenges in coming years.”

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

The proportion of health care-associated infections attributed to resistant organisms has not changed in 2 years, researchers with the CDC’s National Healthcare Safety Network reported.

For the study, the researchers compared National Healthcare Safety Network data on health care-associated infections (HAIs) from 2007-2008 to data from 2009-2010. The infections included central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs), catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and surgical site infections (SSIs). They determined the proportion of isolates resistant to antimicrobial agents.

From 2009-2010, there were 69,475 HAIs reported from 2,039 hospitals: 40% were CLABSIs, 27% were CAUTIs, 10% were VAP and 23% were SSIs. There were 81,139 pathogens identified, of which 82% came from one of eight pathogen groups: Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Coagulase-negative staphylococci, Candida spp., Klebsiella spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Enterobacter spp.

Although the proportion of resistant infections was similar between the two time periods, there was a slight decrease in the number of methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections. The following multidrug-resistant phenotypes comprised 20% of the HAIs: MRSA; vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus; extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant K. pneumoniae/oxytoca, E. coli and Enterobacter spp; and carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae/oxytoca, E. coli and Enterobacter spp.

“These data represent a current assessment of the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant phenotypes associated with HAIs in patients across approximately 2,000 hospitals in the United States,” the researchers wrote. “Several of the resistant phenotypes assessed are not limited to a small subset of hospitals, which should alert the infection control community to the need for vigilance in identification and implementation of appropriate infection control as they address these challenges in coming years.”

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.