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VIDEO: Ibalizumab continues to suppress MDR HIV after 48 weeks

SAN DIEGO — In this video, Brinda Emu, MD, assistant professor of medicine at Yale University, reviews 48-week data of a phase 3 trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of ibalizumab in patients with multidrug-resistant HIV.

Ibalizumab is a long-acting humanized monoclonal antibody administered intravenously every 2 weeks to patients on a failing HIV drug regimen. It is currently undergoing regulatory review in the United States and represents the first new class of antiretrovirals to be submitted for approval in the past 10 years, according to Emu.

Data presented at IDWeek showed that 59% patients with multidrug-resistant HIV receiving ibalizumab in combination with an optimized background regimen were virally suppressed after 48 weeks of treatment.

“Ibalizumab, with an optimized background regimen, has durable viral suppression for these very difficult-to-treat patients,” Emu says.

Reference:

Emu B, et al. Abstract 1686. Presented at: IDWeek; Oct. 4-8, 2017; San Diego.

Disclosure: Emu reports being a consultant for and shareholder of 3VBioscences, Achaogen, Genentech, MedImmune and Theratechnologies.

SAN DIEGO — In this video, Brinda Emu, MD, assistant professor of medicine at Yale University, reviews 48-week data of a phase 3 trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of ibalizumab in patients with multidrug-resistant HIV.

Ibalizumab is a long-acting humanized monoclonal antibody administered intravenously every 2 weeks to patients on a failing HIV drug regimen. It is currently undergoing regulatory review in the United States and represents the first new class of antiretrovirals to be submitted for approval in the past 10 years, according to Emu.

Data presented at IDWeek showed that 59% patients with multidrug-resistant HIV receiving ibalizumab in combination with an optimized background regimen were virally suppressed after 48 weeks of treatment.

“Ibalizumab, with an optimized background regimen, has durable viral suppression for these very difficult-to-treat patients,” Emu says.

Reference:

Emu B, et al. Abstract 1686. Presented at: IDWeek; Oct. 4-8, 2017; San Diego.

Disclosure: Emu reports being a consultant for and shareholder of 3VBioscences, Achaogen, Genentech, MedImmune and Theratechnologies.

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