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HIV infection duration, low CD4 count influence myocardial infarction

The duration of HIV infection and CD4+ T-cell counts may both be independently associated with a patient’s risk for myocardial infarctions, according to a study recently presented in Barcelona.

Researchers examined data from 18,075 European participants with HIV collected through the CASCADE (Concerted Action on SeroConversion to AIDS and Death in Europe) monitoring network. Incidence and potential risk factors for MI — such as duration of HIV infection, most recent CD4 count, exposure to components of ART and various demographics — were examined using univariable and multivariable Poisson regression models.

Eighty percent of the study population was male, and median age at HIV infection was 32 years. MI occurred at least once after infection in 116 participants over 121,493 person-years of examination, with MI rates increasing with duration of HIV infection.

Factors associated with MI risk from both regression models included duration of infection (multivariable analysis RR = 3.26; 95% CI, 2.37-4.5), participant age at infection (multivariable analysis RR = 1.81; 95% CI, 1.54-2.13), and a latest CD4 count below 200 cells/μL (multivariable analysis RR = 2.23; 95% CI, 1.58-3.15). Factors associated with MI identified solely from univariable analyses included increased nadir CD4 and duration of a patient’s immune suppression, while female sex was associated with a reduced risk for MI by multivariable analysis.

“These findings underscore the need to manage cardiovascular risk for people with HIV,” the researchers wrote. – by Dave Muoio

Reference:

Lyons A, et al. Abstract 368. Presented at: European AIDS Conference; Oct. 21-24, 2015; Barcelona, Spain.

Disclosure: Infectious Disease News was unable to determine financial disclosures at the time of publication.

The duration of HIV infection and CD4+ T-cell counts may both be independently associated with a patient’s risk for myocardial infarctions, according to a study recently presented in Barcelona.

Researchers examined data from 18,075 European participants with HIV collected through the CASCADE (Concerted Action on SeroConversion to AIDS and Death in Europe) monitoring network. Incidence and potential risk factors for MI — such as duration of HIV infection, most recent CD4 count, exposure to components of ART and various demographics — were examined using univariable and multivariable Poisson regression models.

Eighty percent of the study population was male, and median age at HIV infection was 32 years. MI occurred at least once after infection in 116 participants over 121,493 person-years of examination, with MI rates increasing with duration of HIV infection.

Factors associated with MI risk from both regression models included duration of infection (multivariable analysis RR = 3.26; 95% CI, 2.37-4.5), participant age at infection (multivariable analysis RR = 1.81; 95% CI, 1.54-2.13), and a latest CD4 count below 200 cells/μL (multivariable analysis RR = 2.23; 95% CI, 1.58-3.15). Factors associated with MI identified solely from univariable analyses included increased nadir CD4 and duration of a patient’s immune suppression, while female sex was associated with a reduced risk for MI by multivariable analysis.

“These findings underscore the need to manage cardiovascular risk for people with HIV,” the researchers wrote. – by Dave Muoio

Reference:

Lyons A, et al. Abstract 368. Presented at: European AIDS Conference; Oct. 21-24, 2015; Barcelona, Spain.

Disclosure: Infectious Disease News was unable to determine financial disclosures at the time of publication.

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