Meeting NewsVideo

VIDEO: 'No clear road map' for HIV cure strategies

SEATTLE In this video, John W. Mellors, MD, chief of infectious diseases at the University of Pittsburgh, discusses the case of a second individual to achieve a long-term, ART-free HIV remission following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

“Let me put this in context,” Mellors said. “This is an extreme, aggressive therapy that has a high attendant mortality, somewhere between 10% and up to 25%, and is only indicated for refractory malignancies. It’s an inspirational case, but it has to be taken in the right context.”

Mellors also provides an overview of other HIV cure strategies presented at the conference this year, such as the modifications of cells in monkey models, the activation of proviruses, and human gene modification.

“This is incremental, stepwise progress towards the ultimate goal of and ART-free remission,” he said, “but let me emphasize that there is no clear road map.”

Disclosures: Mellors reports serving as a consultant for Gilead Sciences.

SEATTLE In this video, John W. Mellors, MD, chief of infectious diseases at the University of Pittsburgh, discusses the case of a second individual to achieve a long-term, ART-free HIV remission following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

“Let me put this in context,” Mellors said. “This is an extreme, aggressive therapy that has a high attendant mortality, somewhere between 10% and up to 25%, and is only indicated for refractory malignancies. It’s an inspirational case, but it has to be taken in the right context.”

Mellors also provides an overview of other HIV cure strategies presented at the conference this year, such as the modifications of cells in monkey models, the activation of proviruses, and human gene modification.

“This is incremental, stepwise progress towards the ultimate goal of and ART-free remission,” he said, “but let me emphasize that there is no clear road map.”

Disclosures: Mellors reports serving as a consultant for Gilead Sciences.

    See more from Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI)