Meeting News CoveragePerspective

Engagement in HIV care rose in New York City

ATLANTA — Those living with HIV in New York City appear to be engaging more with care than in years past, Laura Stadelmann, MPH, of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, reported here.

“In recent years, many strategies have been implemented and expanded as a tool for HIV prevention,” Stadelmann said during a presentation at the 2013 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. “The success of these strategies has been dependent in part on HIV-positive individuals engaging in regular HIV care and achieving undetectable viral loads. Lab values from HIV surveillance data can serve as a way to describe engagement in care.”

Stadelmann and colleagues used data from the New York City HIV Surveillance Registry to characterize New Yorkers with HIV from 2010-2011. The analysis included 63,632 living with HIV, which represented 58% of those with HIV in New York. The data from this analysis were compared with similar data from 2006-2007.

The proportion of those with HIV who had durably suppressed viral loads was 52%, which is a 37% increase from 2006-2007. The proportion of those who had sustained high viral loads was 4.6%, which was a 36% decrease from 2006-2007. Those with sustained high viral loads were more likely to be young, black and have a history of injection drug use.

“More than half of the people with HIV had durably suppressed viral loads, which implies the success of strategies implemented within the past 5 years, including routine testing, early treatment and medical case management,” Stadelmann said. “Although the group with sustained high viral loads is relatively small, it shows an ongoing need to step up prevention and treatment efforts.”

For more information:

Stadelmann L. #1032b. Presented at: 2013 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections; March 3-6, 2013; Atlanta.

Disclosure: Stadelmann reports no relevant financial disclosures.

ATLANTA — Those living with HIV in New York City appear to be engaging more with care than in years past, Laura Stadelmann, MPH, of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, reported here.

“In recent years, many strategies have been implemented and expanded as a tool for HIV prevention,” Stadelmann said during a presentation at the 2013 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. “The success of these strategies has been dependent in part on HIV-positive individuals engaging in regular HIV care and achieving undetectable viral loads. Lab values from HIV surveillance data can serve as a way to describe engagement in care.”

Stadelmann and colleagues used data from the New York City HIV Surveillance Registry to characterize New Yorkers with HIV from 2010-2011. The analysis included 63,632 living with HIV, which represented 58% of those with HIV in New York. The data from this analysis were compared with similar data from 2006-2007.

The proportion of those with HIV who had durably suppressed viral loads was 52%, which is a 37% increase from 2006-2007. The proportion of those who had sustained high viral loads was 4.6%, which was a 36% decrease from 2006-2007. Those with sustained high viral loads were more likely to be young, black and have a history of injection drug use.

“More than half of the people with HIV had durably suppressed viral loads, which implies the success of strategies implemented within the past 5 years, including routine testing, early treatment and medical case management,” Stadelmann said. “Although the group with sustained high viral loads is relatively small, it shows an ongoing need to step up prevention and treatment efforts.”

For more information:

Stadelmann L. #1032b. Presented at: 2013 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections; March 3-6, 2013; Atlanta.

Disclosure: Stadelmann reports no relevant financial disclosures.

    Perspective
    Carlos del Rio

    Carlos del Rio

    New York has been in the lead, along with San Francisco, at embracing treatment as prevention. The city really scaled up testing, linking patients to care and improving engagement in care. In this study, we see that the proportion of people that are virally suppressed has increased dramatically. We know that with treatment as prevention, more people will have viral suppression and then the rate of transmission will decrease. The downstream effect of this is that it will lead to more prevention and less cases of HIV in New York. This is a good example of what we need to be done to decrease transmission and incidence of HIV. We need to see how we can replicate this beyond New York.

    • Carlos del Rio, MD
    • Hubert Professor and chair of the Hubert Department of Global Health Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University

    Disclosures: del Rio reports financial relationships with Gilead and Pfizer.

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