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VIDEO: 96-week data from EMERALD trial

SAN FRANCISCO — In this video from IDWeek, Joseph Eron, MD, professor of medicine at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and director of the UNC Center for AIDS Research Clinical Core, discusses 96-week data from EMERALD, a large randomized trial exploring the switch to a once-daily, single-tablet, darunavir-based regimen in HIV-infected adults who are virally suppressed and on treatment.

The treatment, marketed as Symtuza (Janssen), was approved by the FDA in July.

According to Eron, only 3% of patients who switched to a regimen containing 800 mg of darunavir, 150 mg of cobicistat, 200 mg of emtricitabine and 10 mg of tenofovir alafenamide met the virologic failure endpoint, many of whom went on to re-suppress.

Eron said no patient in the study developed resistance to any of the four drugs contained in the single-tablet dose.

“For clinicians, this provides a single single-tablet regimen that has a very high barrier to resistance,” he said.

Reference:

Eron Jr. J, et al. Abstract 1768. Presented at: IDWeek; Oct. 3-7, 2018; San Francisco.

Disclosures: Eron reports ties with Gilead, Janssen, Merck and ViiV Healthcare.

SAN FRANCISCO — In this video from IDWeek, Joseph Eron, MD, professor of medicine at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and director of the UNC Center for AIDS Research Clinical Core, discusses 96-week data from EMERALD, a large randomized trial exploring the switch to a once-daily, single-tablet, darunavir-based regimen in HIV-infected adults who are virally suppressed and on treatment.

The treatment, marketed as Symtuza (Janssen), was approved by the FDA in July.

According to Eron, only 3% of patients who switched to a regimen containing 800 mg of darunavir, 150 mg of cobicistat, 200 mg of emtricitabine and 10 mg of tenofovir alafenamide met the virologic failure endpoint, many of whom went on to re-suppress.

Eron said no patient in the study developed resistance to any of the four drugs contained in the single-tablet dose.

“For clinicians, this provides a single single-tablet regimen that has a very high barrier to resistance,” he said.

Reference:

Eron Jr. J, et al. Abstract 1768. Presented at: IDWeek; Oct. 3-7, 2018; San Francisco.

Disclosures: Eron reports ties with Gilead, Janssen, Merck and ViiV Healthcare.

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