In the Journals

Telaprevir-based triple therapy outweighed risks for adverse events

Researchers reported that the treatment benefits associated with telaprevir-based triple therapy for HCV offset any problems with adverse events, and recommended the therapy for patients with advanced fibrosis.

In a prospective multicenter study, 102 patients with advanced fibrosis who were infected with HCV genotype 1b received 12 weeks of telaprevir (TVR) in combination with 24 weeks of pegylated interferon alfa-2b (Peg-IFN a-2b) and ribavirin (RBV).

According to the researchers, the sustained virological response rate (SVR) was 69.6%. For treatment-naïve patients and patients who previously relapsed, the SVR rate was over 80%. Prior partial and null responders experienced a significantly low SVR rate (50% and 16.7%, respectively).

Severe blood cytopaenia and a dermatological disorder were common adverse events associated with the treatment, although the rate of treatment discontinuation as a result of adverse events was 12.7%. Notably, the ITPA CC genotype was independently associated with the development of severe anemia (Hb <135 g/L; P=.0008), and lower serum albumin levels (<35 g/L) were associated with infection (P=.0062).

Several factors predicted SVR in the study, including treatment-naïve or prior relapse (OR=6.14; 95% CI, 1.97-20.61), presence of the IL28B TT genotype (OR=3.17; 95% CI, 1.05-10.65) and rapid virological response (OR=5.73; 95% CI, 1.91-19.08), defined as undetectable HCV RNA at week 4.

"[T]reatment success by TVR-based triple therapy for chronic hepatitis C patients with advanced fibrosis is highly expected for those with treatment-naïve and prior relapse," the researchers wrote.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Researchers reported that the treatment benefits associated with telaprevir-based triple therapy for HCV offset any problems with adverse events, and recommended the therapy for patients with advanced fibrosis.

In a prospective multicenter study, 102 patients with advanced fibrosis who were infected with HCV genotype 1b received 12 weeks of telaprevir (TVR) in combination with 24 weeks of pegylated interferon alfa-2b (Peg-IFN a-2b) and ribavirin (RBV).

According to the researchers, the sustained virological response rate (SVR) was 69.6%. For treatment-naïve patients and patients who previously relapsed, the SVR rate was over 80%. Prior partial and null responders experienced a significantly low SVR rate (50% and 16.7%, respectively).

Severe blood cytopaenia and a dermatological disorder were common adverse events associated with the treatment, although the rate of treatment discontinuation as a result of adverse events was 12.7%. Notably, the ITPA CC genotype was independently associated with the development of severe anemia (Hb <135 g/L; P=.0008), and lower serum albumin levels (<35 g/L) were associated with infection (P=.0062).

Several factors predicted SVR in the study, including treatment-naïve or prior relapse (OR=6.14; 95% CI, 1.97-20.61), presence of the IL28B TT genotype (OR=3.17; 95% CI, 1.05-10.65) and rapid virological response (OR=5.73; 95% CI, 1.91-19.08), defined as undetectable HCV RNA at week 4.

"[T]reatment success by TVR-based triple therapy for chronic hepatitis C patients with advanced fibrosis is highly expected for those with treatment-naïve and prior relapse," the researchers wrote.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

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