In the Journals

Better detection methods for NDM-1 urged as prevalence spreads

The link between medical tourism, inpatient care and New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase has been well established in those patients who receive inpatient care in areas such as India and Pakistan, but those who seek outpatient care or no health care at all may be at risk as well, according to the results of a report published online.

J. Kamile Rasheed, PhD, of the CDC, and colleagues recently wrote a paper describing eight patients with New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase (NDM-1) from five different states. The patients were identified between April 2009 and March 2011.

Rasheed and colleagues said one of the patients had been seen for outpatient care, and another had not seen a health care clinic at all, “although the second patient had several active medical problems, including the presence of an invasive medical device during travel.” All of the other patients had been seen for inpatient care while traveling, but did not specifically go to the countries for procedures.

The researchers noted some common traits of NDM-1, including the fact that “isolates were resistant to beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides.”

They concluded that their findings “serve to highlight the need for reliable and rapid means of detecting drug-resistant organisms to implement infection control measures to prevent further dissemination.”

For more information:

J. Kamile Rasheed, PhD, can be reached at the Antimicrobial Resistance and Characterization Laboratory, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.

Disclosure: Rasheed reports no relevant financial disclosures.

The link between medical tourism, inpatient care and New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase has been well established in those patients who receive inpatient care in areas such as India and Pakistan, but those who seek outpatient care or no health care at all may be at risk as well, according to the results of a report published online.

J. Kamile Rasheed, PhD, of the CDC, and colleagues recently wrote a paper describing eight patients with New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase (NDM-1) from five different states. The patients were identified between April 2009 and March 2011.

Rasheed and colleagues said one of the patients had been seen for outpatient care, and another had not seen a health care clinic at all, “although the second patient had several active medical problems, including the presence of an invasive medical device during travel.” All of the other patients had been seen for inpatient care while traveling, but did not specifically go to the countries for procedures.

The researchers noted some common traits of NDM-1, including the fact that “isolates were resistant to beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides.”

They concluded that their findings “serve to highlight the need for reliable and rapid means of detecting drug-resistant organisms to implement infection control measures to prevent further dissemination.”

For more information:

J. Kamile Rasheed, PhD, can be reached at the Antimicrobial Resistance and Characterization Laboratory, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.

Disclosure: Rasheed reports no relevant financial disclosures.